madkeeper
 member, 20 posts
Sun 18 Nov 2018
at 17:03
Tips on Successful Game Advertising
Hello!

1) I've rarely seen an Ad that I'd call too long.  Most ones I pass on are too short or don't give me enough detail (assuming I don't pass on it for other reasons... genre, game system, personal taste, etc).

1A) I prefer flavor, but its OK if the add has some 'business' stuff in it.  A setting hook is useful, so are class suggestions.

2) Assuming the niche games are ones I don't already have an interest in, a good game title and some flavor would definitely help.  Some games offer to help with a new system or provide enough resources that the system's rulebook isn't required... those are games I'd check out, if its stated in the wanted add or the RTJ.  And unfamiliar games that just advertise for character concepts first are also helpful... you don't have to find a book or make a sheet, only to be turned down after you've done all that work.

3) Yes, the system type does factor into my browsing... but I'll usually give 'custom' systems a further look.

Other stuff: While a Game Ad can draw people in, its worth thinking about the public resources that visitor will see.  If there isn't enough, I'm likely to move on.  Having a private OOC thread isn't a deal breaker for me, but I do like to browse them (if available).  There is such a thing as too many resources though :)  I also like to browse the Cast to see what the other characters are like, but that assumes I'm at least half interested by this point.
liblarva
 member, 592 posts
Sun 18 Nov 2018
at 17:13
Tips on Successful Game Advertising
1. Itís porridge. Itís got to be just right. Long enough to include all the basic relevant info, but short enough to be engaging and interesting to read.

1A. Both. If you leave either one out youíll inevitably get questions about it. Which is generally bad because some people will seem interested, but lose that interest based on the answers. Better to answer the basic crunch and fluff questions in the ad itself.

1B. Just in case, itís far better to start with an interest check thread then jumping straight to a players wanted ad.

2. Very. I vastly prefer the smaller Indy games to the big dogs.

2A. If itís a system Iím interested in trying, Iíll be interested even if the premise for the specific advertised game isnít my favorite. If itís a system I donít like, thereís zero chance I will be interested even if the premise is bang on perfect and my favorite of all time.

3. Most times, yes. The more interesting the premise the more wiggle room the system has, but thereís a limit, see 2A above.

A lot of it comes down to writing and style, for me. This is a pbp site, advertising pbp games. If I canít understand what a GM is writing due to lots of spelling mistakes and grammar problems, then Iím going to pass. The only way weíre communicating here is through words. You donít need to be perfect, but being able to communicate effectively with minimal difficulty is a must.

Also, enthusiasm shines through the writing style of most ads. If youíre talking about a ho hum premise for a ho hum system, your writing in the ad reflects that. If youíre really jazzed about the premise and the system, that comes through. You can tell when an ad is ďWell, I guess Iíll do this because itís popularĒ vs ďIím so damned excited about this game!Ē

Some things that are an instant pass: GMs who want players to talk them into running a game. Nope. If youíre not excited to run something in the first place, donít. Games around here already drop like flies, if the GM isnít excited from the start, thereís no hope itíll last. Also, GMs that donít alter the rules to suit a pbp game are a hard pass. If the system uses hard initiative in combat and the GM will insist on everyone posting in initiative order, that GM is too inflexible and that game is going to die.

This message was last edited by the user at 17:18, Sun 18 Nov 2018.

donsr
 member, 1453 posts
Sun 18 Nov 2018
at 17:52
Tips on Successful Game Advertising
for my part.. I  make  it  simple, the link is at the top of the page .. if they are interested  they  will come  to the site and ask.

 not much more  you can do?
Odin442
 member, 56 posts
Sun 18 Nov 2018
at 18:36
Tips on Successful Game Advertising
1) My basic rule of thumb is to look for enough substance that I have an idea what sort of character I would pitch if I wanted in, but enough brevity that I donít feel like I got suckered into reading the preview for your novel. Couple paragraphs to establish a setting and premise in broad strokes is usually ideal; if itís interesting enough that I want details, I can click through to the game and look around before settling in to type up an RTJ.
1a) In my perfect world, an ad would give me an idea of what the setting looks like, even if itís just ďbog-standard kitchen sink fantasy,Ē what kind of characters are thematically appropriate (good/evil, magic/mundane, etc), and the system youíre using. Anything else can be saved for a public thread in the game itself.

2) Obscurityís not really a factor for me. If I have the time and a character that I can massage into the setting and premise, Iíll apply if it looks like I can get my hands on whatever I need to familiarize myself with the basics of the system. A systemís obscurity just makes finding the material a dicier prospect.

That said, Iím more likely to write out an RTJ before reaching for my bookshelf for simpler systems over complex ones. Itís easier to pick up, say, Monsterhearts without a book than Rifts, yísee.

3) Sometimes. There are just some systems I donít like, and some systems that I donít like for certain settings, and some systems I just donít like in a PbP format. Not much to be done about that. If Iím disinterested in the system or I canít see a way to use it to describe a character Iím interested in playing, I was never someone you wanted in that game to begin with.

This message was last edited by the user at 18:38, Sun 18 Nov 2018.

evileeyore
 member, 137 posts
 GURPS GM and Player
Sun 18 Nov 2018
at 19:39
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
Talon:
1) Do you prefer longer or shorter want ads, does longer make it seem like the GM is more invested or too long winded?

It depends.  If they're heavily leveraging a well known setting or genre, they can run short to only a few sentences here.  If they aren't, or they're doing something weird, it's best to get the message across clearly in the ad.

quote:
1A) Do you prefer the Want Ad focus on flavor to give you a glimpse into the game you'll be playing or would you prefer the ad be 'all business' and focus on crunch/mechanical expectations.

Both.  I want to know what characters can be made as well as how the game is going to run.

quote:
2) How likely are you to apply for obscure/niche games (Not D&D, GURPS, Pathfinder, etc) What would make you more inclined to consider a system outside your wheelhouse?

Depends on whether I've been wanting to try it or not and if the hook sounds interesting.  If the game doesn't sound interesting and it's not in a system I've wanted to try, I'm not going to go out of my way to get the rules and read them.

quote:
3) Do you just glance at the system the system will be using and move on ("Oh, not World of Darkness, nope!")...

Oh definitely.  I hate D&D, so D&D games don't get my attention.

quote:
If so, what could an ad do to possibly help mitigate that, I know it can't be overcome entirely, some folks love their systems. A sexier ad title, comparing the style in which the game will be run to more popular systems?

Running a genre I really like but don't get to play often.  Like Spelljammmer or Dark Sun, those can get me into a D&D game on RPoL.
horus
 member, 608 posts
 Wayfarer of the
 Western Wastes
Sun 18 Nov 2018
at 20:02
Tips on Successful Game Advertising
I think we've had a lot of great ideas so far.  Let me attempt to contribute (I like to think I know a bit about writing game ads...)

The example below is for a hypothetical, non-existent game.

I use a basic formula pretty similar to Syrris:

1.) Opening - this should contain the "hook" - a quick blurb (no more than a couple of sentences) about the game, its setting, and what might interest a player character- and adventure-wise.  (I sometimes phrase this as a set of questions directed at the reader.)

2.)  Talk about the RPoL Stuff - Posting Rate, Game Rating, Game System, and any special requirements players need to meet, etc.

3. Wrap Up - Here's where you set the hook and bring the ad home.

Example:

Hi, I'm Heru'ur, and this is Egyptian Evenings.

This game takes place in the reign of Pharoah Ankhenaten, and the tumult that occurred with the introduction of monotheism to ancient Egypt.  Intrigue, adventure, and fortune in the Amarna Period await those who play.

Egyptian Evenings is for Adults Only, and will use a Freeform "exquisite corpse" style of writing adventure.  Posts are expected a minimum of twice a week, but this rate may rise or fall with the agreement of all players.

While familiarity with ancient Egypt of the Amarna period will be helpful, it is not essential, as Heru'ur will guide those less familiar (by posting some background stuff you can read to get up to speed).

So... harp and sistrum, spear, sword, and bow, or pen and papyrus?  Which will you choose, and where will your adventures take you in the cool of Egyptian Evenings?
hegemon
 member, 164 posts
Sun 18 Nov 2018
at 22:05
Tips on Successful Game Advertising
For me; I am drawn to a game if the ad demonstrates a commitment to the coming game as well as showing the me the Storyteller is competent in the game or highly enthusiastic to learn.

What often turns me away from games is if I see the Storyteller has started many games, and they have low posting rates or been quickly deleted after they were started.

Also, I will open a game and not see no to little work in the threads such as setting info, rtj and player expectations. These things are also red flags to me. I am finding that preparation and clear directions to be an indicator that the game might last a little while.
DarkLightHitomi
 member, 1428 posts
Sun 18 Nov 2018
at 22:55
Tips on Successful Game Advertising
It depends on your target audience. There are various types of players. As Gygax put it, some play the game, others play the rules. Naturally, those you do more "playing the rules" will care a lot more about the details of the system, while looking more to "play the game" will care more about the narrative, how much railroading, etc.

And yes, things like how hard you railroad the players and similar are important too.

As for length, I once heard a comparison that works for the length of just about anything, "[It whatever it is] is like a skirt. Should be long enough to cover the subject material, yet short enough to keep things interesting."
Brianna
 member, 2162 posts
Mon 19 Nov 2018
at 06:32
Tips on Successful Game Advertising
I have mostly played D&D or similar type systems, so some of this applies specifically to those.

A bit of flavour to attract my attention, then a bit about the mechanics so that I can rule out things that don't interest me.  For instance, level - if you are running a level 1 or 0 game, I need a bit more flavour to tempt me.  If you are running a high level game, you've probably lost me now.  Posting rate - if you expect one or even more posts per day, I'm out, I can't keep up with that.  In fact in my experience many GMs can't either do that consistently, and the game will start out fine and then dwindle and die.  Role playing or roll playing, little or lots of combat, etc.  World setting, whether a published one or your own - if yours give me a taste.

That's what I can think of right away, but then let's go to the game.  I want to see a thread detailing what I need to do to apply, something about what character creation will require, including an indication of resources allowed, even if I don't have to do more than say what class etc I want to play at first.  More about the setting and game plan would be helpful.  Something about how combat will be handled, since that is so often a major problem with online games.  More about posting, for instance, do you expect a multi paragraph post at least once a day.  Something that would involve a writing sample, even if it's a post from another game; I've too often struggled with other PCs whose players don't seem to have a nodding acquaintance with the basics of spelling, grammar, sentence structure, and coherence.  And if you're taking all who apply without that, I'm not interested; you are possibly going to have too many players, and more than likely not a group I'm compatible with.

This isn't all inclusive, just an overview, and probably more than the OP intended.  But if your game ad does attract my attention, what's the point if as soon as I go to the game, there is nothing to retain it.

This message was last edited by the user at 06:34, Mon 19 Nov 2018.

tibiotarsus
 member, 16 posts
Mon 19 Nov 2018
at 22:28
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
1) Longer, but not putting whole stories in there - think of the blurb as a little trailer for the "film" that is your game, with the expectations etc. in place of the credits/COMING SOON bit.
1a) Flavour! If I can only tell what I'm getting into by the system and the GM's spelling in that one post, my interest wanes massively.

2) Very; things easy to pick up or that have mechanics that speak to me personally would persuade me into something odd.

3) Yep. Mind that some systems just aren't built for the kind of experiences a player is looking for, for instance you don't play a traditional dungeon crawler if you're the type who likes to talk to the monsters, or Call of Cthulhu if you want to hack and slash...more specific ad titles would help, but there'll always be that to consider.

Incidentally, ratings put me off even more than systems, and though I'm probably in the minority I know I'm not the only one...games that have the Adult tag "just in case" rather than with explicit "here be this game's grisly murder rules, here be the smut rules, keep an eye on your thread groups" in the RTJ/rules summary thread if I'm curious enough to click through will generally have me mounting my noble nopetopus steed and vanishing over the horizon, because that's a level of uncertainty I personally don't want to deal with.

Something that I found greatly increased the pickup on my ads (and by players far more suited to the games, at that) was adding in cross-media comparisons, e.g. "you may like [game] if you like [book], [film], [tv series] or just [niche interest]". That might well help with people put off by systems, too, because if you saw your favourite kind of thing in that list, and the game said it was like that thing? You might get a new favourite game! :D

This message was last edited by the user at 22:34, Mon 19 Nov 2018.

facemaker329
 member, 7065 posts
 Gaming for over 30
 years, and counting!
Tue 20 Nov 2018
at 05:12
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
Talon:
1) Do you prefer longer or shorter want ads, does longer make it seem like the GM is more invested or too long winded?


Depends largely on the overall context of the game.  A Star Wars game, for instance, set during the time frame of the original trilogy, doesn't need to say much to tell me what to expect, where something in, say, Pathfinder's game world would need a bit more, just because I'm not as familiar with it.  The example mentioned above about considering your ad to be a 'trailer' for your game is apt...you want enough to give a solid indication of what's going to be involved, without belaboring it.

quote:
1A) Do you prefer the Want Ad focus on flavor to give you a glimpse into the game you'll be playing or would you prefer the ad be 'all business' and focus on crunch/mechanical expectations.


Well, let's put it this way...I've joined games simply because the description of the setting and general timeline/expectations of the game sounded intriguing.  I've never joined a game because of the mechanics involved (but I have opted to pass on many games because of mechanics...and that is important, too, because you don't want to get a bunch of RTJs from people who then find out what the player expectations and game mechanics are and say, "Uh, no, thanks...I didn't know about all that."  People need to know enough to make a semi-informed decision.  That said, I feel it's best to hit the highlights in the ad, but have more detailed information available on an in-game thread that prospective players can look at.  Keep the ad concise.)

quote:
2) How likely are you to apply for obscure/niche games (Not D&D, GURPS, Pathfinder, etc) What would make you more inclined to consider a system outside your wheelhouse?


Depends entirely on two factors:  Does this setting intrigue me enough to be willing to try and engage in learning a new system?  And/or, do I know the GM (or other players) well enough to trust that the system they want me to learn is going to worth learning?  The first weighs more heavily than the second, because I've got some really good friends who run D&D games, and have tried to invite me to join...I've even tried it a couple of times...but I just can't get into D&D again.  I played a lot in high school, and there was just so much chemistry in that group...nothing else I've ever tried with D&D has ever come close to feeling the same way, so I just don't bother anymore.  But I tried Burning Wheel because someone wanted to use it for a Middle Earth-set game that really appealed to me.  I picked up Scion because someone had a very fun and engaging setting for it.  One of the freeform games I'm in had a moderately intriguing setting and I'd been in a different game with the GM, but it could easily have gone the other way and I could have walked away from it without a second thought (glad I didn't, it's been running for over 5 years and 75k+ posts).  The only two 'mainstream' systems I've played since joining RPOL are Shadowrun (started out 4E, adapted to 5E over the course of the game) and WEG's D6 Star Wars system...everything else has been something a little off the beaten path.

quote:
3) Do you just glance at the system the system will be using and move on ("Oh, not World of Darkness, nope!") If so, what could an ad do to possibly help mitigate that, I know it can't be overcome entirely, some folks love their systems. A sexier ad title, comparing the style in which the game will be run to more popular systems?


No, not generally.  I mean, naturally, I prefer games in systems I already know, because it's frustrating for me to be sitting there saying, "Now, how do I do this again?"  I'm not as young as I used to be, and I have plenty of real-world demands on my time that make it difficult to find time to sit down and bone up on a whole new set of gaming rules.  And I don't spend a lot of time shopping around for games.  I'm in two that run pretty consistently, one is moving along at a brisk pace (usually getting one to two dozen posts per day, depending on the day and whose characters are involved in the current action) and the other only updates a couple of times a week, but it's consistent.  I run another one, that's currently on an extended hiatus while I sort out some RL situations.  So, getting me to look in the first place is a challenge that's completely out of your control.

But, when I WAS searching around for games, familiar systems got first look--assuming their headline had enough to attract me beyond the name of the system.  If I couldn't find a familiar system that got my attention, I'd go back through the list again, and look at the settings (again, those headlines had to grab my attention...I didn't just start opening every game ad to see what was going on). A title doesn't have to be 'sexy', but intriguing is a big help.  And, frankly, I'm not supposed to use the kind of language that accurately describes how little impact comparing an obscure system to a common one would have on my decision (but it rhymes with 'cat's rash'...)
Smoot
 member, 131 posts
Wed 21 Nov 2018
at 04:23
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
Talon:
Good morning!

1) Do you prefer longer or shorter want ads, does longer make it seem like the GM is more invested or too long winded?


Longer seems like you're invested. But at the same time, it's okay to summarize or describe things you want to do rather than do the entire setting on the 'want ad'.

quote:
1A) Do you prefer the Want Ad focus on flavor to give you a glimpse into the game you'll be playing or would you prefer the ad be 'all business' and focus on crunch/mechanical expectations.


Bit of both, really. If I'm unable to keep up technically (ie, don't know the system), I want to know that.

quote:
2) How likely are you to apply for obscure/niche games (Not D&D, GURPS, Pathfinder, etc) What would make you more inclined to consider a system outside your wheelhouse?


Lately, I've been favoring games that aren't, basically "This is a D&D game. C'mon, you know what it is, sign up". There've been a lot of good PBtA games, lately, for instance.

quote:
3) Do you just glance at the system the system will be using and move on ("Oh, not World of Darkness, nope!") If so, what could an ad do to possibly help mitigate that, I know it can't be overcome entirely, some folks love their systems. A sexier ad title, comparing the style in which the game will be run to more popular systems?


Sometimes. There are game settings and systems that I'm just not into, no matter what. If your game is really going to be different enough from them that I'd be into it, you're probably going to lose the people who like the game in the first place.

And, per the last part... I'd much rather want to know what a game is than what it isn't.
donsr
 member, 1454 posts
Wed 21 Nov 2018
at 13:01
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
  as  far as  ads go...  If it catches  my  eye , as  far  as  setting  and game  type I will look.

  But I will walk away if is  see the  GM has  a Bunch of  games listed..and even worse?  a Bunch of Deleted games listed. I do not want to waste  my time getting into the game, and the GM  gets  'bored'. Or decides to start a new  game, and the one I am in is  'back burnered'


 so, setting and Game type have thier impact for  me). But I stay away from 'butterfly' GMs.
DarkLightHitomi
 member, 1429 posts
Thu 22 Nov 2018
at 03:46
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
Question donsr, what about a gm that mostly does homebrew playtesting? I try that a lot, but such games get few players and never last long, though one still gets useful feedback from time to time. Naturally that means lots of short and dead games.
donsr
 member, 1459 posts
Thu 22 Nov 2018
at 05:18
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
yep DarklightitomiÖ But, that's  what I would avoid. I run my own system in ,y best game, and it works  pretty well...had it not worked  it would have been scrapped  and I would have a deleted fame on my roles?

 As a Player. I want to join a game I know that will last,and the GM/DM  will put  as much into it  as I do as a player.

 So if there are Playtesting  GM  out there, and they have a long list of  deleted..dead  games?.. I'll just pass. There are  more then enough players   to go around, who like  short  quick  games?
facemaker329
 member, 7066 posts
 Gaming for over 30
 years, and counting!
Thu 22 Nov 2018
at 07:18
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
Do the titles of the games reflect that they are for playtesting?  That might be an advisable step to take, if you aren't already.  Or if you've tested what you wanted in that game and are wrapping it up, changing the game name to indicate that it's served its purpose might be advisable.  The GM of the Shadowrun game I used to play in did that when she concluded the game...left the name the same, but tacked '(Complete)' on the end of it so anyone looking at her games would see this inactive game was inactive because the story had been told and the game was over, as opposed to the GM just walking away from the game and leaving the players in the lurch.

I would think, for playtesting games, you'd want that in the game title, anyway, as it's an immediate filter...players who are't interested in playtesting will know to stop looking, right there, while those who are will immediately have a good reason to look at the ad and learn more.
DarkLightHitomi
 member, 1431 posts
Thu 22 Nov 2018
at 11:04
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
donsr, aren't you assuming that all my games would be playtests? If I ran a game intended to be long term, it wouldn't erase the multitude of playtest and exoerimental games. I ask cause I really am considering running a full game cause I can't find anyone to play over discord.

facemaker, I normally put that under system, it can be seen on the list. Generally I get a few people before bothering with a game and an ad though anyway, but your idea would still be a good idea to adopt I think.
NowhereMan
 member, 258 posts
Thu 22 Nov 2018
at 11:35
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
I run into a little bit of trouble along that line as well, but for different reasons.

I will occasionally decide that I want to work on a particular game concept and go through the process of setting up a game for it, only to discover that the particular idea I had either won't work the way I want it to, or that it's not as fun a concept as it seemed. Because of this, out of the five deleted games I currently have listed, only two of them have more than two posts.

That list of deleted games probably looks somewhat bad to a potential new player, but there's nothing to be done about it, really. Doesn't help that I like running small or solo games, so a game with just a few hundred posts can actually be a long-running and quite active game.

To contribute to the original question:

I tend to prefer ads that skip the narrative description and give me roughly the same material as you'd expect to see on the back of a published module - basic plot, setting, expected number of players, etc.

The biggest turn-off for me is an ad with typos and/or grammatical errors. Obviously ESL GMs and those of us that are dyslexic or similar get a bit of a pass on that one, but when it's just silly little errors like "Dungeons adn Dragons: Teh Tomb of Horors" (especially in ad titles) it tells me that the GM just isn't putting in the effort.
donsr
 member, 1460 posts
Thu 22 Nov 2018
at 15:10
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
yeah?   I am Guilty  there. I have a  bit of a problem with   'switched  letters'.. Spell check doesn't even catch them all... and?..   I had to look up what Teh  was?... Turns out  it is  accepted as 'the'..  and I have no clue   why  'ing'  doesn't light up  when  'ign' appears at the end of a word?


 you add to that the   game centric  slang, and  pronunciations  I use for NPCs.. I suppose  even spell check can't catch everything. I will go back  and 'fix' longer posts, but in the  end, My Vet players  seem to handle it well enough.


 I am more geared to  GMs/DMs  putting effort into running the  game, then trying to pass   a grammer class.
horus
 member, 610 posts
 Wayfarer of the
 Western Wastes
Thu 22 Nov 2018
at 18:07
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
NowhereMan:
That list of deleted games probably looks somewhat bad to a potential new player, but there's nothing to be done about it, really. Doesn't help that I like running small or solo games, so a game with just a few hundred posts can actually be a long-running and quite active game.


Where does one go to see how many games a GM has deleted?  How long do deleted games stay in this record?  What about GMs that keep a dead game around, rework it, and start it back up?  What about folks like me who have four "games" going, two of which are discussion groups?

quote:
The biggest turn-off for me is an ad with typos and/or grammatical errors. Obviously ESL GMs and those of us that are dyslexic or similar get a bit of a pass on that one,


How does one know when one is looking at an ad fielded by a dyslexic, ESL, or otherwise English-impaired person?

quote:
but when it's just silly little errors like "Dungeons adn Dragons: Teh Tomb of Horors" (especially in ad titles) it tells me that the GM just isn't putting in the effort.


Heh.  "Teh Tomb of 133t Horrorz"  I might do something like that for a lark somewhere downrange.  A little intentional silliness is okay, right?  Thanks for an idea seed.
donsr
 member, 1461 posts
Thu 22 Nov 2018
at 18:12
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
Horus

 For me?  when I look  up the game on the 'wanted' page.. way down at the bottom it will list all the games that GM  has... it will list  deleted  games..and   it  will give a  total

 IE:  5 games  runnign 10 deleted  ect.

 other games  you have to research.when was the last  time there was a post?... then check the site  if  you are able to see  when/who the last posts were by

 ::shurgs:: there are  a couple games on my list that the GMs  have went dark, that I post on because I knew the GMs  and 'try to keep players toegther'..or offer them a spot in  one of my games, until the GM comes back.... you can never tell is a  'live'  came is active. unless you can go in and see the posts.
horus
 member, 611 posts
 Wayfarer of the
 Western Wastes
Thu 22 Nov 2018
at 18:21
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
Thanks, donsr.

I try not to measure a GM by any numerical method alone.  We are all people, and entitled to some human dignity until we prove we deserve otherwise.

I've been here a good while, and only have two real games going.  My first is presently under re-construction to apply lessons learned before I start it back up.  My second is still in progress, albeit at a holiday routine kinda pace lately.

I try to field rich settings in which a player can experience a sense of immersion in the milieu.  I try to administer games fairly and with an eye for what's right for the players as a group and as individuals.  I try.  When I fail, I try again, and try to do better the next time.  It's a simple creed -- keep trying.
donsr
 member, 1462 posts
Thu 22 Nov 2018
at 18:33
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
yep yep.

   I have a niche game.. I have a semi-free form D&D game  that  I tweaked   rules for..and  my Space game  that is  my system..

  Over the years  from other sites.. I have seen GMs  'get bored' and want to 'move on'

 Player  do that too..some go dar..some have class  and tell you theya re leaving..heck.. we had  2 RL deaths , thatw as  the only thing that stopped those players... have one missing from CA, that we thing the fires may have got... but?..I like my games... I try to  have my players like them..and keep them  moving... you can't make  every one happy, and my games are not for everyone?...
NowhereMan
 member, 260 posts
Fri 23 Nov 2018
at 10:54
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
Horus:
Where does one go to see how many games a GM has deleted?


Precisely what donsr said. There may be other ways of looking it up, but I don't know them.

quote:
How long do deleted games stay in this record?


Permanent deletion is a manual effort on the part of the mods, who do so occasionally. I don't recall exactly how long they try to keep between purges.

quote:
What about GMs that keep a dead game around, rework it, and start it back up?


You can see in the More Information About [GM name] when the last post was in each of their games. There's no real way to know if a game is dead or just in rework-limbo without asking the GM in question, but I generally assume good faith and that if a GM's game hasn't been deleted, they're planning to do something with it.

I have a "dead" game on my games list, because it's a collection of solo games all kept under one umbrella, and I'm not currently running any of that kind of game. It also has a tiny number of posts because I make a habit of deleting dead games there in order to keep things clean and Group slots open.

quote:
What about folks like me who have four "games" going, two of which are discussion groups?


Personally, I would consider a GM running multiple discussion groups in addition to their own games to be quite a responsible GM, and not one likely to drop off the face of the Earth two weeks into a game, but also a GM that is incredibly busy. Depending on how much attention I plan to demand, that may or may not be a good thing.

quote:
How does one know when one is looking at an ad fielded by a dyslexic, ESL, or otherwise English-impaired person?


You usually don't have to. In my experience here, GMs that have an issue with English for whatever reason are pretty up-front about it. I recall a GM that was around a while back that had a note about being dyslexic in their bio lines. I also recall seeing an ad for an Italian GM that wanted to run in English in order to practice the language. All anecdotal evidence, so your mileage may vary.

quote:
A little intentional silliness is okay, right?  Thanks for an idea seed.


Oh, of course. Intentional "errors" are an entirely different monster. Perhaps using "Teh" was a poor example, since it's worked its way into pop-culture vernacular, but what I meant was "I didn't bother to spellcheck" errors rather than any particular word usage.
bigbadron
 moderator, 15668 posts
 He's big, he's bad,
 but mostly he's Ron.
Fri 23 Nov 2018
at 16:07
Re: Tips on Successful Game Advertising
horus:
Where does one go to see how many games a GM has deleted?

It's listed at the bottom of the game ad.  Deleted games stay on the list until they are purged from the site.  How long that takes depends on several factors, but would never be less than a year.