IIB - Central City.   Posted by The Keeper.Group: 0
The Keeper
 GM, 43 posts
Sat 29 Aug 2015
at 17:01
IIB - Central City
After Hackett and d'Anjou depart on their individual errands, Colonel Travis places a phone call to New Orleans Police Headquarters, where he is able to speak with a Sergeant of his acquaintance, Ron Guidry, who served under the Colonel in the Army. Guidry listens to Travis' description of the officer that Garvin met with. Pausing to consider the details, Guidry says, "That sounds like Sean MacClery. He's only been on the force for about two years. Good kid. Works out of the Uptown Precinct. If memory serves, I think he walks a beat on St. Charles."

A follow up phone call to the Uptown Precinct confirms that MacClery is on duty that day, assigned to patrol on St. Charles Avenue. The desk sergeant lets Travis know that MacClery also assists with any problems with the streetcars, when required.


The office of the parish medical examiner on Melpomene Avenue in Central City is a somber, nondescript two story brick building with a small sign posted in front which identifies its purpose. The lobby is cold and empty. No visitors are seated in the straight backed chairs arranged neatly around the granite floored room.

A gray haired, female attendant sits at a desk placed in front of a pair of doors that lead further back into the building. She looks up with mild curiosity when the Colonel enters. "May I help you, sir?" she asks.
Colonel Travis
 player, 54 posts
 Age 54 APP 6 SIZ 12
Tue 8 Sep 2015
at 13:55
IIB - Central City
"My name is Colonel William Travis, and I'm here to speak with the medical examiner about the recent demise of a young man," he said, speaking in the genteel way he had come to talk, his accent touched in part by his native Texas and in part by his adopted home of New Orleans. He bore himself with the imprimatur and dignity of his former rank, but didn't loom or swagger, instead acted the polite older gentleman at the same time.
The Keeper
 GM, 50 posts
Thu 10 Sep 2015
at 00:54
IIB - Central City
"Oh, yes, sir," the woman says, regarding Travis with a long look. "I believe Dr. Freeman is in his office this afternoon. May I ask who this is in reference to? Are you a family member of the deceased?"

OOC: Colonel, if you would, kindly give me a Credit Rating and/or Persuasion roll.
Colonel Travis
 player, 55 posts
 Age 54 APP 6 SIZ 12
Thu 10 Sep 2015
at 02:26
IIB - Central City
Credit Rating: 38

21:25, Today: Colonel Travis rolled 38 using 1d100.  Credit Rating (75).

The Keeper
 GM, 53 posts
Sat 12 Sep 2015
at 16:55
IIB - Central City
After the Colonel informs the clerk that he is there to inquire about the death of Peter Garvin. Nodding she stands and disappears through one of the doors behind the desk. A moment later, she returns. "Come this way, sir," she says, gesturing for Travis to follow.

She leads him to a small, somewhat spartan office, furnished with a desk, a pair of chairs, and a large bookcase laden with medical reference volumes. Seated at the desk is a clean shaven man with neatly trimmed dark hair. He is studying the contents of a file when Travis enters.

"This is Colonel William Travis, Doctor," the clerk says.

The doctor stands, offering his hand. "Dr. Blake Freeman, Colonel. How can I be of assistance?"
Colonel Travis
 player, 56 posts
 Age 54 APP 6 SIZ 12
Sat 12 Sep 2015
at 16:59
IIB - Central City
"Good to meet you, Dr. Freeman, though I must say I regret the circumstance, though no doubt you get that a lot," he said. "May we be seated? I won't take too much of your time, I promise, but I have a question or two that I was hoping you might be kind enough to answer about the demise of a young man who is a colleague of a good friend of mine. Nothing of a personal nature, so there'd be no breach of propriety on your part - I'd never ask that - but simply something looking to set a friend's mind at ease," he said, gesturing to the chairs nearby.
The Keeper
 GM, 55 posts
Sun 13 Sep 2015
at 23:51
IIB - Central City
"Of course. Please have a seat, Colonel."

After he is seated, Freeman says, "Janice had indicated that young man you were inquiring about was Peter Garvin." He shakes his head. "It's always terrible to lose someone so young."

"What questions do you have?"
Colonel Travis
 player, 57 posts
 Age 54 APP 6 SIZ 12
Mon 14 Sep 2015
at 17:59
IIB - Central City
"Indeed it is. I've seen more of that than any man should, as I'm sure you have as well," he said.

"My question," he said, removing his fedora and holding it as he spoke, "is as to the cause of death in this case. Presumably, Mr. Garvin had a fall of some sort, and where was found implies that this fall was from a four story building. Does the trauma suffered by the body support that presumption?"
The Keeper
 GM, 56 posts
Thu 17 Sep 2015
at 04:09
IIB - Central City
Dr. Freeman frowns, his eyes momentarily studying the surface of his desk. "Colonel, before I say anything, I want to be clear about this: I believe that the police handled Mr. Garvin's death as well as they possibly could. I've worked with Detective Quinn for almost three years now. He's very thorough about his work. Takes his job seriously. He's a good man."

He spreads his hands. "The truth is I'm not positive what the cause of Mr. Garvin's death was. In the end, the injuries he suffered from his fall were certainly the worst of the injuries he sustained, so I felt comfortable with attributing his death to them."

"I admit, the amount of trauma he sustained is suggestive of a fall from a greater height. Perhaps one twice as high as the four story building the police found him near."
He sighs. "The problem being, there wasn't any other structure nearby that could account for such a fall. In the end, I think the police came to the only conclusion they could given the facts they had."

"I will say that Mr. Garvin had suffered some other wounds that could have caused, or most certainly contributed to, his death. Injuries that he would not have sustained due to a simple fall."

Colonel Travis
 player, 58 posts
 Age 54 APP 6 SIZ 12
Thu 17 Sep 2015
at 14:59
IIB - Central City
The Colonel held up his hands, as if in surrender or supplication. "By no means is it my intention to impugn or call into question the job done by our city's fine police officers. They do excellent work, constrained both by practicality and resources as they are. Sometimes, however, the conscience of someone who cares cannot so easily be at rest with the same findings that we as a society must accept as a job completely done," he said.

"That having been said, have you considered the possibility, that is, are there signs that the body may have been moved?" he asked. "And also, what sorts of other injuries did the poor young man suffer other than the fall?"
The Keeper
 GM, 58 posts
Sat 19 Sep 2015
at 19:12
IIB - Central City
Freeman leans back in his chair, frowning as he considers the Colonel's questions. "I believe that the police had considered the possibility that the body could have been moved. My understanding is that the circumstances, especially the time when the body was discovered, would have made that a very difficult proposition. Mr. Garvin was found early enough in the evening that it seems unlikely that one of the students or professors that were still on campus would not have seen him being moved. In addition, there were marks in the earth, reasonably deep ones, that were consistent with Mr. Garvin having fallen where he was found."

"Mr. Garvin's other injuries..." Freeman pauses, struggling to frame his words. "He had roughly four lacerations in the chest area. Deep wounds that appeared to have caused significant blood loss. They were not consistent, at least in my view, with the use of a weapon such as a knife. The wounds were not straight cuts. The tissue was violently torn. Something you would honestly expect to result from an attack by a wild animal."

"Mr. Garvin also had a series of puncture wounds on his shoulders. Two on the front of each shoulder, one on the back of each. Those wounds were also deep and much cleaner than the injuries he sustained to the chest."


He rubs his jaw thoughtfully. "Although the wounds to his shoulders were severe, they weren't fatal. The lacerations to his chest...they could have been. One was deep enough to expose bone. When I examined Mr. Garvin, it was hard for me to determine just how much blood loss he had suffered. But given the amount of trauma he had sustained from the fall, I felt comfortable in attributing his death to that cause."

"I recognize I may not be providing you the clarity you had hoped for, Colonel. I'm sorry. Here, in Louisiana, it isn't out of the realm of possibility for someone to be attacked by an animal. The swamplands certainly have their share of dangers. But inside the city, it's obviously quite unlikely. Unfortunately, nothing in my examination, nor in the facts that the police uncovered, could provide any insight into how Mr. Garvin suffered those injuries."

Colonel Travis
 player, 59 posts
 Age 54 APP 6 SIZ 12
Sun 20 Sep 2015
at 14:57
IIB - Central City
"I can see how that all the facts seem to paint a picture that's about as clear as mud," he said quietly, taking note of some of the particulars in his journal.

"And I believe you that nothing in your examination could provide the cause of injury. I've seen what serious injuries can do to men in my time, Dr. Freeman, from the hands of man and the claw of beast. The difficult part for me is both the how and the why. Even if we accept that we don't know how the injuries came to be, I cannot help but wonder how a man with injuries as severe as you've described would be able, both physically and mentally, to make his way into a building, climb four flights of stairs, make his way to the edge and throw himself off - let alone from a taller building. In my experience, men with such severe wounds can rarely be called upon to move themselves a few feet - let alone such a great distance. I also find it strange that having survived what seems like a close brush with death, which in my experience is a life affirming event, he might have then chosen to commit suicide. If he had such tendencies, why not simply let the creature do him in?" He shook his head, bemused.

"In truth, I wonder how this was ruled a suicide and not a homicide. I don't know the young man personally and am free from that bias, but there's not a fiber in my being that can come up with a plausible explanation for him jumping off a building in his condition. Mostly, in terms of what he was physically capable of doing in his condition."
The Keeper
 GM, 60 posts
Sun 20 Sep 2015
at 22:25
IIB - Central City
Freeman nods as he listens to Travis' reasoning. "Colonel, I wonder if I might speak to you in confidence. I would appreciate it if would not share what I'm about to tell you, especially if you happen to speak with Thomas Quinn at some point in the future. If Detective Quinn chooses to reiterate this information to you, that is certainly his business, but I would prefer that you not let him know that you had previously heard it from me."

He looks down at his hands briefly. "A man such as yourself I'm sure stays reasonably well informed about the goings on in our city. I imagine you read about the recent murder of Sonny Bartolo in one of the papers. Bartolo was a well known lieutenant in Sam Carolla's organized crime outfit. Right after he was gunned down in the Irish Channel, Detective Quinn was assigned to the case."

"It's a high profile matter. Not just because it was the death of a prominent gangster, but because, as I'm sure you're aware, there have been wide spread concerns about corruption in the police department. Prominent members of the city administration, as well as police leadership, want to see the case solved quickly, to show that the police are taking decisive action on these matters. They also hope to use any leads generated not just to put Bartolo's killer in jail, but to bring more members of these criminal organizations to justice."


He shakes his head. "Quinn agreed with my assessment of Mr. Garvin's cause of death, but he asked some of the same questions you have. He believed, at the very least, that the evidence was inconclusive. That based on what had been learned, he couldn't make any certain statements regarding the circumstances of the young man's death. Quinn wanted to keep the case open, to look into it further."

"He told me, when we met to review the autopsy findings on Mr. Bartolo, that his Captain had ordered him to close Garvin's case, primarily so he could focus solely on Bartolo. Captain Powell apparently said that the additional injuries could be attributed to a prior suicide attempt on the same night, such as the young man trying to deliberately crash his automobile. Never mind that Mr. Garvin didn't own one. In any case, Quinn was told to close the case as a suicide. He did as he was ordered."


He drums his fingers on his desk. "I certainly hope you won't think less of Detective Quinn for this, Colonel. I can assure you, in my experience, he is a dedicated, honest officer."
Colonel Travis
 player, 60 posts
 Age 54 APP 6 SIZ 12
Wed 23 Sep 2015
at 13:44
IIB - Central City
"Of course, Dr. Freeman. You have my word that I will not betray your confidence," he said before allowing the doctor to continue. Colonel Travis was a regular reader of the newspaper, and he had read about the Bartolo murder, and so nodded when it was mentioned and continued to listen on as Freeman spoke.

"I'm glad to know that I'm not the only one that has doubts about how conclusive the evidence is in pointing toward a suicide. As for Detective Quinn, I won't think any less of him. I spent a good part of my life in the military, and I know that you have to respect the chain of command, even if you disagree. I understand completely the position he was in. If I thought less of anyone, it would be the people up the chain pushing to rule a death a suicide without fully investigating it, though I can perhaps understand their desire to exercise limited resources in the most effective way possible." He paused, rubbing his lips together.

"Still, I imagine that will provide little comfort to his family, and leaves open the possibility that there's another killer out there in the city that has escaped justice. Nevertheless, I think it at least gives me an avenue of inquiry. I plan on speaking with Detective Quinn, but as I told you before, on my honor I will respect your confidence."

Colonel Travis rose to his feet and extended a hand to Dr. Freeman. "I know you're a busy man, doctor. Thank you for your time, and for your honesty."