NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)   Posted by Christopher.Group: 0
Cecily Winthrop
 player, 15 posts
Wed 26 Dec 2018
at 17:19
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Cecily leans in, completely enraptured by Starkweather's dramatic delivery and enthusiasm.

"We're going to retrace their steps. We're going to find the camp where those poor men met their end if we can. We're going to find them to give them a proper burial. Moore and the rest of the brain boys will be going over the old bones and such, the plants..."

He pauses and looks at Moore. Moore answers,

"The tentative scientific nomenclature for the species is Veteres Lake. 'Lake's elder ones.' In honor of my late colleague, God rest his soul."


Her face clouds over, and she seems to be about to interrupt when she remembers her manners and nods sympathetically.

As Starkweather goes on to talk about the mountains and exploration, her interest wanes, and her attention drifts back to Professor Moore. She seems more interested in his reactions to Starkweather than what Starkweather himself is saying.

When Starkweather finishes, she listens to Berty's enthusiastic response with a smile, and waits until his question has been answered and there is a pause in the conversation. She takes a deep breath, then hesitates. Tentatively, she says "Professor Moore, all I know is what I read in the papers, and, well, of course I have a thousand questions about the discoveries, the methodologies, the..." Her brow furrows, and again she hesitates. "I was just a little confused, about the way things ended. The way they were described. They said that it was a storm, but... the descriptions of what they found...? Is there more to it than what they said...?"

This message was last edited by the player at 17:21, Wed 26 Dec 2018.

Christopher
 GM, 748 posts
Wed 26 Dec 2018
at 18:21
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
(waiting a wee bit for a reaction from Vladimir; without one, he will sit nodding attentively as the others' comments are addressed)
Vladimir Mudragel
 player, 10 posts
Thu 27 Dec 2018
at 04:42
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Vladimir waited patiently, the anxiety of being forced to wait was chewing at him.  An expedition like this wouldn't last without a man of his talents.  Just think, his name would be known the world over.  He'd get offers from every rich somebody to take them and see the sights no one dared find.  The history books...wait a minute...

"I'm sorry...miss...Winthrop, is it?"

Her tone had caught his attention and he turned his head towards the woman; no grin of any kind appeared.

"What did they find?"
Cecily Winthrop
 player, 16 posts
Thu 27 Dec 2018
at 05:28
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
"I'm sorry...miss...Winthrop, is it?"

She nods.

"What did they find?"

She again hesitates. "Well. I'm sure you've read the reports...or I don't know, maybe you haven't. The scientists on the last mission, they found...well, it was quite exciting, really. Fossils, yes, geological remnants of various fauna and flora from -- well. A very long time ago. Longer ago than we thought possible, for the kinds of things they were finding. And..."

She smiles nervously. "Well, of course, we have no reason to doubt the reports. Either of the scientists, or those who found...what...remained of their camp. But apparently it wasn't just fossils, you see. Actual fully preserved specimens, highly developed, quite entirely unlike...well. Anything, from the limited description that was provided in the papers.  Only when the rest of the team arrived, they said the site had been struck by a storm that killed everyone there. The 'specimens' were gone, though, if I remember correctly. And...."

She steals a quick, almost apologetic glance at Prof. Moore. "I just wasn't sure if there was, perhaps, anything left out of the papers? We know that there are creatures that can survive sustained droughts, and other extremes. I...please forgive me, I know I can sometimes let my imagination run away with me. I just want to be clear on what I'm walking into. If you'll have me, of course, for the expedition."


Cecily looks back at Vladimir, with an awkward smile and an apologetic shrug. "I apologize if I'm being alarmist. I'm sure it probably was just the storm -- which is tragic enough, of course. The wording of the article, though?" She shakes her head, realizing how silly the whole thing sounds now that she's spoken it out loud. "I'm sorry, Professor Moore, Mr. Starkweather. I hope you'll forgive me for speaking out of turn."

Albert Higgenbothem
 player, 25 posts
Thu 27 Dec 2018
at 06:11
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Berty sits in excited contemplation, fidgeting no longer nervously pure excitement.
Christopher
 GM, 749 posts
Thu 27 Dec 2018
at 06:40
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)

Starkweather's eyes roll up toward the ceiling in seeming exasperation.

Moore says, putting his clipboard down for a second,

"Doctor Winthrop, I appreciate your question. Mr. Starkweather will probably put it up to female emotionality."

Starkweather says nothing, but continues to look at the ceiling impatiently, his hands behind his head. Moore looks at him a bit nervously and continues:

"I assume you are referring to the reports that Professor Lake relayed to McTighe. That was the expedition's radioman.

"We'll be in contact with him by radio throughout the expedition, by the way. He was sending broadcasts to Arkham then; you he'll be receiving them. We will be in contact with him and Professor Pabodie."

Starkwweather interrupts, becoming lively again:

"Yes! Pabodie, the inventor of the Pabodie Drill! They used that in their investigations. Science moves on, and the drill has been perfected! Our engineers will be using a better version."

Moore: "Yes, Lake said some quite remarkable things. But Dyer looked at his notes and what was left of the specimens after the storm. He concluded that they were marine plants, albeit of unbelievable age -- as a colleague, you can imagine how exciting this is! Complex, large vegetable organisms, at a time when traditional paleontology says that only the most primitive life existed!!! And preserved through the aeons through some unknown means!

"But, plants nonetheless. Dyer thinks that Lake had gone 'snow crazy.' It's a common affliction -- all the snow, the days that never end, the isolation. They can cause you to go a little mad.

"They couldn't find one of the graduate students. Dyer suggests that the poor devil went crazy and ran amok, killing the rest of the camp and the dogs before they could react, then ran off into the Ice to freeze. Poor Gedney, his name was."


Starkweather:

"Mr. Higgenbothum, the expedition leaves in mid-September. We will be a couple of months at sea, then hit the Ice, make camp on the Ross Ice Shelf, and then move inward.

"Why don't you tell ne a bit about yourself? You're an Englishman, and that's a bonus for you! You aim to be one of our pilots, I believe?"





Cecily Winthrop
 player, 18 posts
Thu 27 Dec 2018
at 06:54
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
"Doctor Winthrop, I appreciate your question. Mr. Starkweather will probably put it up to female emotionality."

Cecily blushes furiously, clenches her jaw, and stares pointedly at the floor for the remainder of Moore and Starkweather's response.
Christopher
 GM, 751 posts
Thu 27 Dec 2018
at 06:59
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Cecily Winthrop:
"Doctor Winthrop, I appreciate your question. Mr. Starkweather will probably put it up to female emotionality."

Cecily blushes furiously, clenches her jaw, and stares pointedly at the floor for the remainder of Moore and Starkweather's response.


You catch Moore looking at you sympathetically as Albert responds...
Albert Higgenbothem
 player, 26 posts
Thu 27 Dec 2018
at 17:53
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
“Yes sir, flying for so long I may sprout wings soon. I was born in Surrey, my father was an explorer, Randolph, as soon as I was out of the cradle he took me with him to Africa. He lead the way through the bush with a compass in hand and me in the other. I was 16 when I started learning to fly. Father decided it would be a handy talent for the society. So I started slowly a few short trips with father and some cargo then to larger longer expositions.”

Berty a bit unnerved talking about his father continues:

“Got the hang of flying quite quickly l. Very steep learning curve in Africa. Lack of run ways, mountains, weather changes in a wink of the eye, all the trappings of a novel. Eventually, the explorers society decided to move in a different direction and I came to the states. A place where the spirit of adventure and exploration is still very alive and vibrant.”

Clearing his throat

“Sir, I would serve you proudly as your pilot. This is a singular chance of a life time and I would die not be a part of it.”
Christopher
 GM, 752 posts
Thu 27 Dec 2018
at 18:09
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Albert Higgenbothem:
“Yes sir, flying for so long I may sprout wings soon. I was born in Surrey, my father was an explorer, Randolph, as soon as I was out of the cradle he took me with him to Africa. He lead the way through the bush with a compass in hand and me in the other. I was 16 when I started learning to fly. Father decided it would be a handy talent for the society. So I started slowly a few short trips with father and some cargo then to larger longer expositions.”

Berty a bit unnerved talking about his father continues:

“Got the hang of flying quite quickly l. Very steep learning curve in Africa. Lack of run ways, mountains, weather changes in a wink of the eye, all the trappings of a novel. Eventually, the explorers society decided to move in a different direction and I came to the states. A place where the spirit of adventure and exploration is still very alive and vibrant.”

Clearing his throat

“Sir, I would serve you proudly as your pilot. This is a singular chance of a life time and I would die not be a part of it.”


"Ah! Africa! I spent years there! Years! In the War, I served His Majesty in Rhodesia -- you look a bit young to have been in the War, eh?

"Then my safari business in Kenya. Years of guiding people who had more money than they knew what to do with! Maybe you know my book, Death in Africa?

"We can trade old stories, eh? Imagine -- there on the Ice, a million degrees below zero, and talking about the African heat! Capital!

"We'll have three planes. Two Boeings, state of the art craft outfitted for the cold, and a smaller plane. We've a couple of pilots on the team already -- but three planes means three pilots, right?

"But... flying in Antarctica isn't flying in Africa. Do you have any experience with cold weather? I mean very cold."



Albert Higgenbothem
 player, 27 posts
Thu 27 Dec 2018
at 19:39
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
A slight giggle from the idea of talk of Africa in the frozen wastes.

“Yes sir I do know your book a splendid read. No I missed the war, blessing and a curse. I have had a number of positions flying for those lovely chaps in Scandinavia. Loads of heavy equipment supply runs and the lot. I do fancy myself a quick study. Not a plane built I can’t fly.”
Christopher
 GM, 753 posts
Thu 27 Dec 2018
at 20:23
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Albert Higgenbothem:
A slight giggle from the idea of talk of Africa in the frozen wastes.

“Yes sir I do know your book a splendid read. No I missed the war, blessing and a curse. I have had a number of positions flying for those lovely chaps in Scandinavia. Loads of heavy equipment supply runs and the lot. I do fancy myself a quick study. Not a plane built I can’t fly.”


"This makes Scandinavia look like the Sahara, Mr. Higgenbothem! What an adventure it will be. eh?

"Can you imagine? Flying over -- through -- those mountains? The Himalayas are pygmies by comparison!

"What about you, Mr. ah, Mudrageel? I apologize if my pronunciation is a bit off!

"You're a hunter of big game, eh? In Africa I suppose too?

"What's your interest in our expedition?"

Cecily Winthrop
 player, 19 posts
Thu 27 Dec 2018
at 23:45
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
As Starkweather blusters and brags, Cecily relaxes a bit. She sits placidly, smiling blandly, her hands folded politely in her lap.
Vladimir Mudragel
 player, 11 posts
Fri 28 Dec 2018
at 06:26
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
quote:
Dyer thinks that Lake had gone 'snow crazy.' It's a common affliction -- all the snow, the days that never end, the isolation. They can cause you to go a little mad.


"Ah yes, it is actually more common a problem then you would think.  The isolation and complete darkness have a way of turning a man's mind in strange ways...not that it's true in every scenerio."


Hearing his name, Vladimir turns his attention once more back to the loud, boisterous gentleman leading the expedition.

"Actually, I've never set foot below the equator, hence part of my interest.  I'm something of a game hunter, yes, but more like a guide for hunters.  I've grown up plying the northern seas and landscapes.  From fishing to hunting to trekking through frozen wastes, I've done it all and lived to do it again.  Antarctica is the land I have yet to conquer, surrounded by a sea I have yet to sail.  And my skills are what you need to survive."


The more he speaks the larger he swells his chest till he's almost arched his back to add even more height.  As his speech winds down, he once more streaks his fingers across his mustache.
Christopher
 GM, 754 posts
Fri 28 Dec 2018
at 06:55
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Vladimir Mudragel:
quote:
Dyer thinks that Lake had gone 'snow crazy.' It's a common affliction -- all the snow, the days that never end, the isolation. They can cause you to go a little mad.


"Ah yes, it is actually more common a problem then you would think.  The isolation and complete darkness have a way of turning a man's mind in strange ways...not that it's true in every scenerio."


Hearing his name, Vladimir turns his attention once more back to the loud, boisterous gentleman leading the expedition.

"Actually, I've never set foot below the equator, hence part of my interest.  I'm something of a game hunter, yes, but more like a guide for hunters.  I've grown up plying the northern seas and landscapes.  From fishing to hunting to trekking through frozen wastes, I've done it all and lived to do it again.  Antarctica is the land I have yet to conquer, surrounded by a sea I have yet to sail.  And my skills are what you need to survive."


The more he speaks the larger he swells his chest till he's almost arched his back to add even more height.  As his speech winds down, he once more streaks his fingers across his mustache.


"SO you plan on joining our team of Arctic experts, eh? We have a bunch of fine fellows lined up, Scandinavians mostly, and a Pole.

"You are Russian? Not a Bolshevik, I hope!"


He chuckles.
Cecily Winthrop
 player, 20 posts
Fri 28 Dec 2018
at 23:24
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
"Ah yes, it is actually more common a problem then you would think.  The isolation and complete darkness have a way of turning a man's mind in strange ways...not that it's true in every scenerio."

Cecily looks to Vladimir as he speaks, and draws a breath as if to say something...then presses her lips together in a tight smile.
Christopher
 GM, 755 posts
Sat 29 Dec 2018
at 01:42
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
(If Vlad doesn't answer, I'll make up some comment for him :) )
Christopher
 GM, 756 posts
Sat 29 Dec 2018
at 20:29
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Vladimir says something noncommittal.

Moore scribbles something down on his clipboard and looks up.

He says,

"James, this is Professor Winthrop. She is a colleague of mine. I think very highly of her work on Pleistocene whales!"


Starkweather looks at the ceiling for a moment and then at Cecily, speaking somewhat distractedly..

"Good day, Mrs. Winthrop. Have you discussed your plans for adventure with your husband?"

Cecily Winthrop
 player, 21 posts
Sun 30 Dec 2018
at 04:19
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
"James, this is Professor Winthrop. She is a colleague of mine. I think very highly of her work on Pleistocene whales!"

Cecily beams at Moore, and inclines her head in acknowledgment and thanks.

"Good day, Mrs. Winthrop. Have you discussed your plans for adventure with your husband?"


Cecily looks thoughtfully at Starkweather for a moment, and then smiles. "Doctor, Professor, or Ms., but not Mrs., if you please, Mr. Starkweather," she says, with an emphasis on his title. "My husband, God rest his soul, passed away a few years ago. Not, however, before we had divorced, following his having knocked up the housekeeper. When her husband returned from his deployment overseas the next year... well. No one was surprised when he shot him. No one except my ex-husband, I suppose! She was left in quite a pickle - husband in jail, the father of her child dead. Fortunately, I needed someone who could look after the house when I was doing research abroad, and in exchange she and her son had a place to live."

She pauses for effect, letting all that sink in for a moment, then smiles brightly. "So you see, I'm quite free to pursue my own professional goals. Which have been going quite well of late, as Professor Moore referred to. Some of the cetacean fossils I uncovered on a recent dig, which dated from the early Pleistocene era, were significantly larger than those that have been found from earlier periods, indicating that while most other species were becoming smaller, they were becoming larger. Now, to determine why that is will require a lot more information than we have at present, but--"

She stops abruptly, then chuckles and looks at Berty. "See? I'm doing it again. I just get carried away talking about research."

Directing her attention back to Moore and Starkweather, then adopts a more sober tone. "Dr. Moore, Mr. Starkweather. I believe my education, training, and experience make me uniquely qualified for this expedition. My more established colleagues can afford to make safe choices as regards their research. It's in their best interest to make incremental progress, as opposed to risking their careers with potentially revolutionary discoveries. To be perfectly frank, I need a win. I need a discovery that is mine, that someone else isn't going to take credit for. I need this expedition, but you need me too."

"So....can we come to an arrangement?"

Christopher
 GM, 758 posts
Sun 30 Dec 2018
at 13:18
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Cecily Winthrop:
"James, this is Professor Winthrop. She is a colleague of mine. I think very highly of her work on Pleistocene whales!"

Cecily beams at Moore, and inclines her head in acknowledgment and thanks.

"Good day, Mrs. Winthrop. Have you discussed your plans for adventure with your husband?"


Cecily looks thoughtfully at Starkweather for a moment, and then smiles. "Doctor, Professor, or Ms., but not Mrs., if you please, Mr. Starkweather," she says, with an emphasis on his title. "My husband, God rest his soul, passed away a few years ago. Not, however, before we had divorced, following his having knocked up the housekeeper. When her husband returned from his deployment overseas the next year... well. No one was surprised when he shot him. No one except my ex-husband, I suppose! She was left in quite a pickle - husband in jail, the father of her child dead. Fortunately, I needed someone who could look after the house when I was doing research abroad, and in exchange she and her son had a place to live."

She pauses for effect, letting all that sink in for a moment, then smiles brightly. "So you see, I'm quite free to pursue my own professional goals. Which have been going quite well of late, as Professor Moore referred to. Some of the cetacean fossils I uncovered on a recent dig, which dated from the early Pleistocene era, were significantly larger than those that have been found from earlier periods, indicating that while most other species were becoming smaller, they were becoming larger. Now, to determine why that is will require a lot more information than we have at present, but--"

She stops abruptly, then chuckles and looks at Berty. "See? I'm doing it again. I just get carried away talking about research."

Directing her attention back to Moore and Starkweather, then adopts a more sober tone. "Dr. Moore, Mr. Starkweather. I believe my education, training, and experience make me uniquely qualified for this expedition. My more established colleagues can afford to make safe choices as regards their research. It's in their best interest to make incremental progress, as opposed to risking their careers with potentially revolutionary discoveries. To be perfectly frank, I need a win. I need a discovery that is mine, that someone else isn't going to take credit for. I need this expedition, but you need me too."

"So....can we come to an arrangement?"


Moore jots down some notes and says, "yes, James, Professor Withrop's paleontological research impressed me greatly. I was very happy to see that she applied to join the expedition. She has a first-rate scientific mind!"

Starkweather's gaze clouds.

OOC: divorce is very rare in 1933

He mutters something under his breath. Then continues,

"Hm, all that is well and good, Mrs... Professor Winthrop. I am, uh, sorry for your, um, loss.

"But where are you children? You are... not that young."


OOC: can I get Hard Listen rolls from everyone to hear what he muttered?
Cecily Winthrop
 player, 22 posts
Sun 30 Dec 2018
at 17:10
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Starkweather's gaze clouds.

OOC: divorce is very rare in 1933


OOC:  I'm aware. ;-)


"Hm, all that is well and good, Mrs... Professor Winthrop. I am, uh, sorry for your, um, loss.

"But where are you children? You are... not that young."


Cecily's eyebrows go up, threatening to retreat into her hairline. She stares at Starkweather in astonishment during a long, uncomfortable silence. Then, she shakes her head, closes her eyes for a moment, takes a deep breath, and folds her hands in her lap.

"Mister Starkweather. I appreciate your concern for my well being. However, I do not see the others here being subjected to this level of personal scrutiny. I am a highly trained professional, esteemed in my field. If you would like to discuss my research, how it relates to the discoveries of the previous team, or anything else to do with my qualifications for this position, I am happy to talk about any of that. If you are going to restrict your inquiries to subjects wholly unrelated to the purpose of this interview or this expedition?"  She glances to either side, looking at Berty and Vladimir. "I think that says a great deal about your own values and priorities." 

Turning her attention back to Dr. Moore, her tone softens. "Professor, I would very much like to be a part of this work. I understand many of my colleagues have reservations, given the disastrous mismanagement of the previous expedition, and the lack of any institutional affiliation for this endeavor. I believe there is important work to be done here, that can make a real, meaningful contribution to science. To our understanding of the world, and our place in it."

"Mr. Starkweather. I assure you, my personal affairs are in order, and will not interfere with my ability to do the important scientific work of this expedition. Do you have any relevant questions for me about my background?"

Christopher
 GM, 759 posts
Sun 30 Dec 2018
at 17:29
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Moore looks at Cecily and says, "I was part of the planning phase of the Miskatonic Expedition. I certainly hope that if there was mismanagement, it was not from my end, and certainly not from Dr. Dyer!"

Starkweather says,

"Alright everyone, I think that that is enough. Moore and I know where to get in touch with you. If we decide to bring you onboard, you'll be hearing from us soon!"

Moore says, "the letters of recommendation?"

Starkweather: "oh, of course. Please leave them on the sofa on the way out.

"Thank you for coming. Have a good day, everyone! If you can stand this heat!"

Vladimir Mudragel
 player, 12 posts
Sun 30 Dec 2018
at 20:10
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Vladimir bids the gentlemen good day and leaves the requested papers.  Exiting the room, he finds no relief in the change of scenery as the afternoon temperatures were beginning to creep in.  Beads of sweat slowly began to form across his forehead as he slowly made his way down the hall towards the stairwell.  He had sailed the southern seas a few times, never was to his liking, but at least the air at sea wasn't so stagnant.  A breeze almost always existed on the seas.
Cecily Winthrop
 player, 23 posts
Sun 30 Dec 2018
at 21:45
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Moore looks at Cecily and says, "I was part of the planning phase of the Miskatonic Expedition. I certainly hope that if there was mismanagement, it was not from my end, and certainly not from Dr. Dyer!"

Cecily stammers, "I...n-no, I didn't mean to imply... just that had you been given the support that you needed, I..."  She trails off into nothingness, looking absolutely crestfallen. She mumbles, "I'm sorry. Thank you for your kind support, Dr. Moore. I hope to work with you again someday in the future. Perhaps...a-after you return."

She smiles stiffly in Starkweather's direction, not making eye contact, barely looking up from the floor. "Thank you for your time, sir."

Fumbling with her briefcase, Cecily manages to remove several sheets of paper, and hurriedly drops them on the couch as she walks briskly toward the door. Closing it gently behind her, she stops outside in the hall, and leans back against the wall. With shaking hands, she retrieves a handkerchief from her purse. She dabs gently at her eyes, trying not to smudge her mascara, and blows her nose before crossing over to the elevator and pressing the call button.
Albert Higgenbothem
 player, 28 posts
Sun 30 Dec 2018
at 22:29
Re: NEW YORK, NEW YORK! (July 25, 1933)
Berty again with a slight bow and stiff posture.
“Good day gentlemen, I am sure we will make history with this! Perhaps the heat is something we will be missing soon.”

Berty adjusts his suit extends his hand again to Moore and Starkweather.

He makes his way to the door and holds it open for his other interviewees.