Resources.   Posted by GM.Group: 0
GM
 GM, 14 posts
 Narrator
Sun 30 Apr 2017
at 00:03
Resources
Off-site resources for this game.

Japanese Culture:  http://www.jnto.go.jp/eng/inde...al/experience/d.html
This site is Japan's National Tourism page.  It is FILLED with relevant cultural information and I HIGHLY suggest a look.

Chinese Culture: https://www.travelchinaguide.com/intro/
A tourism page for China.  It also is filled with relevant cultural information and I highly suggest a look.

This message was last edited by the GM at 00:08, Sun 30 Apr 2017.

GM
 GM, 18 posts
 Narrator
Tue 2 May 2017
at 23:50
Resources
http://japanloverme.tumblr.com/archive

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Hatsuyume (初夢) is the first dream a person will have in the new year. It is a traditional Japanese belief that the dream will foretell the future/luck that awaits the dreamer in the coming year~!
ヽ(^。^)丿

It is also believed that having a hatsuyume involving the following shall bring good luck to the dreamer:
1. Mount Fuji (high position)
2. Hawk (cleverness and strength)
3. Eggplant (nasu 成す - achieve something great)

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Hello JapanLovers! ( ゚▽゚)/ Today’s かっこいい lesson is about kendo, a Japanese sport/martial art! ☆

☆ Kendo literally means “Way of the Sword”.

☆ The protective armor used in kendo is called bōgu/kendōgu.

☆ The size and weight of the shinai (practice/competition weapon usually made of bamboo slats) varies depending on the age and size of the wielder.

☆ According to the All Japan Kendo Federation (AJKF), the concept and purpose of kendo is as follows:

“Concept

Kendo is a way to discipline the human character through the application of the principles of the katana.

Purpose

To mold the mind and body.
To cultivate a vigorous spirit,
And through correct and rigid training,
To strive for improvement in the art of Kendo.
To hold in esteem human courtesy and honor.
To associate with others with sincerity.
And to forever pursue the cultivation of oneself.

Thus will one be able:
To love one’s country and society;
To contribute to the development of culture;
And to promote peace and prosperity among all peoples.”

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Our かっこいい lesson for today is all about the basic differences between a maiko (geisha in training) and a geisha. ~ ✿

Geisha are generally simpler and more mature in appearance as compared to maiko (which is also true in ceremonies and special events, in which even though geisha are dressed more extravagantly than usual, their maturity and elegance still shows through). Maiko are often seen as a more youthful and more fun, almost childlike, version of a geisha. (◡‿◡✿)

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Hi everyone! Hope you had a wonderful holiday yesterday. Today’s かっこいい lesson is about the shuriken and the kunai!(✧ω✧)/

Trivia:

✧ The shuriken and kunai were both historically crafted/recycled from common carpentry, gardening, and household tools.

✧ Shuriken (手裏剣) literally means “sword hidden in the hand”. They are a supplemental weapon to the main sword (or any other main weapon in a samurai warrior’s arsenal, and are often used for tactical purposes.

✧ The art of wielding the shuriken is known as shurikenjutsu.

✧ According to history, kunai was not mainly used as a knife. It was used (by the shinobi/ninja) for prying open walls, trapdoors, and ceilings; and for climbing trees and wooden shafts (much like a grappling hook).
When used as a weapon, it was more commonly used for stabbing, rather than slashing, because of its slightly blunt edges (usually only its tip was sharpened).
Contrary to popular belief, kunai was not designed to be a throwing weapon (though one can still throw it like any other weapon and cause damage, of course). xD

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Hi JapanLovers!  Today’s かっこいい lesson is about the nihontō (Japanese swords, or literally, blades). (ノ≧∀≦)ノ

This illustration show the different types of nihontō, and the basic parts of a handle, or tsuka.  (We tried to be as simple and asbasic as possible~ >3<)

Additional info:

✧ Katana is now modernly used as the general term for Japanese swords.

✧ Odachi (the big big sword!!) was commonly used in ceremonies, and not (or very seldom) in battle. Due to its huge size, it is worn strapped to the back rather than on the belt/obi of the wielder.

✧ Nakago is what you call the tang, or the part of the blade inserted into and covered by the handle (tsuka). The swordsmith’s signature (called “mei”) is placed on the nakago.

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Today’s かっこいい lesson is about the basic parts of the (women’s) kimono. ♡(˃͈ દ ˂͈ ༶ )

✿ Nagajuban collar - Nagajuban is an inner garment that is worn under the kimono like an inner robe. The only part that can be seen from the outside is its collar, which is commonly white. Sometimes, a detachable (usually decorated) collar called haneri is sewn onto the nagajuban collar for variety and style~ ^^

✿ Tomoeri - the outer, protective collar of the kimono.

✿ Ohashori - a neatly-folded flap of excess kimono fabric as a result of adjusting the length of the kimono to one’s height.

✿ Obi - a sash that secures and holds the kimono together. It is tied at the back in a number of different artful ways.

✿ Obi-age - another sash-like part tucked into/above the obi that helps to secure it.

✿ Obi-jime - is a belt or cord tied around the obi to help secure it in place

✿ Obi-dome - a decorative accessory that is fastened into the obijime.

✿ Sode - sleeve

✿ Tamoto - sleeve pouch (usually seen in furisode)

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Hi JapanLovers! ヽ(・∀・)ノ

Our かっこいい lesson for today is about the shinobi (忍び), or more commonly known as ninja. ・ω・

✧ Did you know that contrary to popular belief, ancient shinobi were not exactly proven to wear black outfits (called shinobi shōzoku)? Since they were usually on covert missions, they commonly disguised themselves as civilians such as merchants, monks, performers, guards, or normal townspeople.

✧ Shinobi/Ninja’s usual missions are: espionage, infiltration, sabotage, and assassination. They are also trained to perform countermeasures and hand-to-hand combat, if necessary.

✧ Due the shinobi’s covert methods, they are usually regarded as the opposite of the samurai, who observed strict rules about honor and combat.

✧ Shinobi are trained in ninjutsu, which teaches the art of espionage and survival skills. There are 18 different skills taught in ninjutsu, which includes stealth, escaping, disguise/impersonation, unarmed combat, weaponry, pyrotechniques, horseriding, and even spiritual refinement.

✧ Shinobi are also popularly believed to possess legendary and superhuman abilities such as shapeshifting, control of the elements, and walking on air/water. These abilities are allegedly attained through intense physical, mental, and spiritual concentration, and through performing a series of “hand seals”, or “kuji-kiri”.

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Today’s かっこいい lesson is about kabuto, a traditional Japanese helmet used by ancient warriors. The kabuto is also an important part of samurai armor and equipment. ´・ᴗ・`✧

Basic parts:

- Hachi: the dome-like top part covering the top of the head, usually made up of overlapping elongated metal plates. The inside of the hachi has a cloth lining called Ukebari.

- Tehen kanamono: an ornament fitted into a small opening on top of the hachi called tehen

- Mabizashi: the visor on the front of the hachi

- Kasa jirushi no kan: a ring at the back of the hachi for securing a kasa jirushi (helmet flag)

- Fukigaeshi: wing-like or ear-like projections to the sides of the hachi

- Shikoro: a suspended neck guard composed of multiple overlapping lames

- Shinobi-no-o: a cord tied under the chin to secure the kabuto to the head, or to a mengu (facial armor)

- Maedate: a crest used as a frontal decoration, or a tatemono.

Trivia:

- “Katte kabuto no o o shimeyo” is a Japanese proverb which translates to “tighten your kabuto strings even after winning the war”. It means to never lower your standards or effort even after achieving success. (๑✧◡✧๑)

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Today’s かっこいい lesson is about kabuto, a traditional Japanese helmet used by ancient warriors. The kabuto is also an important part of samurai armor and equipment. ´・ᴗ・`✧

Basic parts:

- Hachi: the dome-like top part covering the top of the head, usually made up of overlapping elongated metal plates. The inside of the hachi has a cloth lining called Ukebari.

- Tehen kanamono: an ornament fitted into a small opening on top of the hachi called tehen

- Mabizashi: the visor on the front of the hachi

- Kasa jirushi no kan: a ring at the back of the hachi for securing a kasa jirushi (helmet flag)

- Fukigaeshi: wing-like or ear-like projections to the sides of the hachi

- Shikoro: a suspended neck guard composed of multiple overlapping lames

- Shinobi-no-o: a cord tied under the chin to secure the kabuto to the head, or to a mengu (facial armor)

- Maedate: a crest used as a frontal decoration, or a tatemono.

Trivia:

- “Katte kabuto no o o shimeyo” is a Japanese proverb which translates to “tighten your kabuto strings even after winning the war”. It means to never lower your standards or effort even after achieving success. (๑✧◡✧๑)

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Here’s a good luck charm to keep and spread around! We love maneki-neko! (๑ↀᆺↀ๑)ฅ✧

The maneki-neko (“beckoning cat”) is a Japanese cat figurine charm believed to bring good luck to the owner.

Trivia:
- The cat is usually a calico (tricolor) Japanese bobtail. Calico cats are considered lucky!
- White maneki-neko (or calico) : good luck in general
Black maneki-neko : good health
Gold maneki-neko : good monetary fortune
- It is believed that the higher the paw, the luckier.
- The gold coin (called koban) indicates “ten million ryō” (千万両), which is a huge sum of money!
- It is a Japanese belief that when a cat washes its face, a visitor will arrive. From this came the belief that the maneki-neko’s gesture will bring in customers and good fortune. (*ΦωΦ*)

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Hi everyone!  Today’s かっこいい lesson is about kanzashi (簪), hair ornaments used in traditional Japanese hairstyles.

Basic Types:

Bira-bira - composed of dangling, tinkling metal strips and/or long chains of silk flowers.

Kogai - an ornament made up of a “sword and a sheath”, usually sold as a set with:

Kushi (comb kanzashi) comb hair ornament with delicate decorations.

Tama - Ball style kanzashi, with prongs to stick on the hairstyle.

Kanoko Dome -heavily decorated dome-like hair ornament usually place towards the top-back of the traditional hairstyle.

Ōgi - fan-shaped, fancily decorated kanzashi, with dangling aluminum strips.

Tsumami Kanzashi - Literally, ‘folded fabric hair ornament’, usually shaped as flowers (hana kanzashi).

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The furisode (振袖) is a style of kimono that is made of very fine, brightly colored silk, and is commonly rented or bought by parents for their daughters to wear when celebrating Coming of Age Day the year they turn 20. Source: http://goo.gl/GBXCF7

Trivia:

Kyary Pamyu Pamyu’s single “Furisodeshon” celebrated her “Coming of Age” as she turned 20 years old last January this year.

“In the video, Kyary is portrayed drinking alcohol and smoking, activities which are newly legal for the singer to engage in, as 20 is the minimum legal age for both in Japan. Choreography during the song’s chorus references the number "2”, which corresponds with the lyrics “はたち” (hatachi, the age of 20).“ http://goo.gl/lWfQhJ

She also wore a super kawaii "KPP-fied” furisode (with planets and unicorns!) to celebrate her coming of age! >3<

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Hi everyone! Here’s a quick lesson about Japanese traditional footwear! ☆*・゜゚・The more you know ・゜゚・*☆ (๑>ᴗ<๑)

A. Geta
- It’s a type of footwear which is elevated due to practical reasons. It is commonly used to protect one’s feet from getting wet from rainwater or snow.
- Oval geta for women; rectangular geta for men. ;3

B. Merchant’s Geta
- Higher teeth (elevation), to protect one’s feet from getting dirty/wet from the marketplace / trading area.

C. Okobo (Geta)
- Special geta meant to be used by geisha-in-training (also called maiko). Red straps represent newbie geisha~ ✿

D. Zōri
- Flat, slightly more formal than geta, usually associated with the kimono (geta –> yukata).

E. Tabi
- Japanese socks with toe separation between big toe and other 4 toes.

F. Jika-tabi (Tabi boots)
- (literally “tabi that contact the ground”) 20th century modified tabi. They are heavy-duty (with rubber soles) and are meant to be used outdoors.

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Did you know that according to Japanese superstition, breaking the thong/strap on one’s geta is considered very unlucky!

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GM
 GM, 19 posts
 Narrator
Sat 6 May 2017
at 14:03
Resources


Rat 子

Ox 丑

Tiger 寅

Rabbit 卯

Dragon 辰

Snake 巳

Horse 午

Sheep 未

Monkey 申

Rooster 酉

Dog 戌

Boar 亥

This message was last edited by the GM at 14:05, Sat 06 May 2017.