Welcome to the Party!   Posted by Storyteller.Group: 0
alexsayshi
 player, 30 posts
Tue 3 Jul 2018
at 23:57
Welcome to the Party!
Oh! Haha totally misinterpreted that! Whoops! I'll go write a new post :P
alexsayshi
 player, 31 posts
Tue 3 Jul 2018
at 23:59
Welcome to the Party!
Also, not sure about what the rules are for general rated games, but maybe you should just bump it to mature since there is fighting and swearing now? I don't know how that works.
Storyteller
 GM, 35 posts
Wed 4 Jul 2018
at 00:05
Welcome to the Party!
I have no idea either, but you're probably right...
alexsayshi
 player, 32 posts
Wed 4 Jul 2018
at 00:07
Welcome to the Party!
*shrugs* I only ever run adult games because I don't want to worry about things crossing a line.
Storyteller
 GM, 36 posts
Wed 4 Jul 2018
at 01:42
Welcome to the Party!
Right!?

I saw someone complaining one time that games don't need to be rated Adult and I'm like: "But... I'm an Adult..."

I like games that can delve into bad stuff and can get nasty when appropriate.  I'm probably going to start making all my games Adult cause I don't want to worry about it.
alexsayshi
 player, 34 posts
Wed 4 Jul 2018
at 01:44
Welcome to the Party!
Exactly. To me its not worth the risk. I've definitely gotten some complaints though in rmail messages about people wanting to be let into my games but can't because they are adult.
alexsayshi
 player, 35 posts
Wed 4 Jul 2018
at 04:17
Welcome to the Party!
So he would try to get them to stop, but do so in a way where he wouldn't be putting himself in danger, would I roll something and then post relating to the outcome? Or post and then roll and then do from there? This is where my unfamiliarity with dice based games comes in.
Storyteller
 GM, 38 posts
Wed 4 Jul 2018
at 15:16
Welcome to the Party!
Perfect moment to go into the fundamental philosophy behind system-based games.

So, obviously, it all comes down to the moment your cop shoots their robber - who wins?  I actually don't know how it's handled with free-form games cause I've been too scared to play one, but for us round-the-table gamers, we resolve it with dice rolls.

But, of course, the number of possible situations that could unfold during a game means no system can comprehensively cover every scenario.  Therefore, you have a Dungeon Master or Game Master or Storyteller there to referee things.

Finally, the randomness of the outcomes, the desire for each player to have their time in the spotlight, and the needs of the story being told by the GM means that the most important concept of any roleplaying system is actions.

An action being a specific activity or task that a character is trying to accomplish.  And almost every RPG really just breaks down to a system that determines how you mechanically represent the actions that a character takes.  How much time each character has, what determines their chance of success or failure, and the results of those outcomes.

All actions a character takes generally fall into one of these categories:

  1. Actions that are so easy, routine, or insignificant that they don't require a dice roll.
  2. Actions that are difficult, dramatic, or complex enough to require a dice roll.
  3. Actions that, for whatever reason, success or failure is guaranteed.


Actions in the first group are things like walking, talking, making a sandwich, changing a car tire, reading a book, sending a text, or even driving a car.  These are anything your character could do (and probably frequently does) any day of the week. Things that is make no sense for your character to roll dice for (how often have you failed to walk somewhere? Sure, you stubbed your toe that one time, but that was one of how many steps during your life? Plus, it's not dramatic and makes a shitty story).

Actions in the second group are the bread and butter of RPGs.  Do you hit your target when you shoot?  Can you convince that troll not to eat you?  Can you lift that stone with the Force?  You roll dice and see what happens.  In most cases, the GM will actually tell you the final outcomes of your actions.

The final category is much more often things you can't do than things you can (since, if it would succeed automatically it's probably in the first category).  Can you punch a hole in drywall?  Sure.  Can you punch a hole in steel?  No.

So, as the Game Master has the final say, the best option is to either tell him what you're trying to do or ask if it's possible to do something, then let him tell you what to roll or discuss the consequences of your actions.

A couple of notes about this:

It may seem like you're just letting the GM control everything your character does, which doesn't sit well with many people.  And, back in the day, many Dungeon Masters did take advantage of the power they had over the game.  DnD suffered from a Players vs. DM vibe for a while.  And you can still come across "old school" GMs every once in a while.  But, for the most part, RPGs have matured and the gamer base has with them.  The vast majority of games make it a point to emphasize that the game is meant to be cooperative and collaborative, and that the GM should strive to tell a good story and make the game fun rather than trying to defeat the players.  Don't let it worry you, have a little faith in you GM, find some people you trust to roleplay with, and if you do end up in a bad situation, you can easily just step away on RPOL.

The other side of that is that as you pay games, you'll start to have a better sense of which of those three category your action falls into.  If the game defines some of the actions you can do and what you have to roll, you can simply tell the GM your action and roll the dice.  Many games have lists of actions and almost every game with powers of some kind will tell you when and how you can use them.  There may be situations where the GM limits your options (this guy is crazy from the drugs and won't listen to reason), but as you get experience you'll pick up on those things.  You'll start to know when you can simply declare actions and when you need to ask permission.

I know this was a lot but I wanted you to get a comprehensive explanation, so you know the 'why' in addition to the 'what'.
Storyteller
 GM, 39 posts
Wed 4 Jul 2018
at 23:25
Welcome to the Party!
So, with most around-the-table roleplaying games, there's a solid back-and-forth between the players and the game master.  Most games usually starts off with a discussion about the world, who the characters are, and what their place is in the universe.  During the first session, the GM presents a situation the characters are involved in, or a job to do, or a quest to accomplish.  From there, the story progresses as characters take action to further their goals or survive the challenges presented by the GM.

For individual actions, the player may simply describe what their character does; may tell the GM what action they're taking and wait for him to tell them what stats to roll; may suggest a stat to accomplish a specific goal; or may simply ask if it's possible to take some specific action.

The GM will decide whether a roll is necessary, what stats will be used, and after the roll will usually describe the outcome of the action (based on the results of the roll).

That seems to be a foreign concept to a lot of people on RPOL, but most of us IRL gamers are used to the GM having the final say in what our character's accomplish.  But, we also expect them to (mostly) play by the rules and try to make a cool story and not just kill us all.

So, the three most basic ways to approach an action are:

  1. Suggest a way to use some specific attributes, skills, Merits, or disciplines to use to resolve the situation.
  2. Describe what, specifically, you want your character to do (and/or what you expect to accomplish) and let the GM decide what stats or rolls are required.
  3. Ask what your options are, what's possible to accomplish in the time and with the resources that you have.

Again, as you gain experience with these types of games, it'll become easier to know what you can and cannot do, what will require a roll and what will automatically succeed (or fail), etc.

The bottom line of all this is that you don't decide what succeeds or fails, the game system and the GM do, so focus on the action your character takes and not the outcome.

Going with Adrien as an example, you could look at the ideas above and the posts thus far and come up with things like:

"I get the bartenders attention and have him call security over to break up the fight!" (you know you don't need to roll to speak to someone, and you know your employees will do what you say) (of course, your security might not be able to break up a frenzied vampire fight, but what you are doing doesn't need a roll)

"I use a Athletics to jump behind the bar and avoid the fight!" (you know it would be Dexterity + Athletics, but it's always good form to wait for the GM to agree - free may also be penalties you need to know before you can roll. Of course, in pbp some GMs will tell you to go ahead and roll when you post just to save time)

"I gonna try to grab one of them and hold them back - do I need to roll initiative?" (most systems treat combat differently than basic rolls and use an 'initiative order' to determine who gets to take the first action, for some abrupt encounters you might jump in during the middle of a round)

"Can I use Nightmare to frighten them off?" (you lie it would normally work, but being under the influence of a frenzy may change that, so asking is always a good idea)

Those are just some possibilities. I didn't want to give away any freebies, cause I want you to decide what you think the best option is.  I'm still willing to discuss it before you commit, however.
alexsayshi
 player, 36 posts
Wed 4 Jul 2018
at 23:30
Welcome to the Party!
Great thank you! I think that Adrien's response would be a bit of a mix, he would try and signal the bartender to alert secrutiy to the issue but would also attempt to talk them down (im guessing that would be a roll related to persuasion?), I doubt that he would try and grab any of them since hes not really a fighter and relies more on personality and words.
Storyteller
 GM, 40 posts
Wed 4 Jul 2018
at 23:36
Welcome to the Party!
Of course. I was just trying to illustrate different possibilities.

The main takeaway is that you pretty much want to describe up to the moment of the roll, then leave the rest to the dice and the GM.  And definitely add as much description as you can.  Include what you actually say, for example, just not how the target reacts.

This message was last edited by the GM at 23:37, Wed 04 July 2018.

alexsayshi
 player, 37 posts
Wed 4 Jul 2018
at 23:41
Welcome to the Party!
Okay :) I'll work on a post shortly, just got home and have a few to catch up on
alexsayshi
 player, 41 posts
Sat 7 Jul 2018
at 03:39
Welcome to the Party!
Hey sorry for not getting anything up today!
Storyteller
 GM, 44 posts
Sat 7 Jul 2018
at 03:55
Welcome to the Party!
No worries.  I'm not timing you, lol.
alexsayshi
 player, 42 posts
Sat 7 Jul 2018
at 03:59
Welcome to the Party!
I just always feel bad when I donít post daily :P
Storyteller
 GM, 46 posts
Mon 16 Jul 2018
at 17:34
Welcome to the Party!
Had it been a week?

Man, I had so much going on I didn't realize - I was just waiting for this thread to go red and didn't notice how long it's been.

If you're still there, did you want to keep going or do you think you've learned enough from me?

It's unfortunate there's so much hate against Requiem.  I thought I had a really good concept there, but no one wants to try it and I don't feel like running Masquerade right now.
alexsayshi
 player, 44 posts
Mon 16 Jul 2018
at 17:39
Welcome to the Party!
eeep! I'm sorry ! I didn't realize that it had been that long either!

I'm still here :) I've really appreciated all the help you've given me!

I thought it was a good concept too. Do you think that if you started on up and put up a wanted add people would join? I've never really had much trust for the interest checks and what not.
Storyteller
 GM, 47 posts
Mon 16 Jul 2018
at 20:59
Welcome to the Party!
I could try that.  I was just surprised at the number of people hating on first edition Requiem.

Second edition isn't really that different, and I feel like the things they did change didn't need to be fixed.  Eh.  To each their own, I guess.

I saw some person say they'd never play Fate and wouldn't ever pay money that will go back to Fred Hicks.  I'm like... Did he kill your dog?

I dunno, maybe it's like Varg Vikernes.  That dude is literally a murderer and a racist, so don't buy Myfarog.

And now I stop ranting.  I guess I don't have anyone else to complain to, if I'm writing it here, lol.

Anyway, you should post so I can make bad things happen to your character.  >:D
alexsayshi
 player, 45 posts
Mon 16 Jul 2018
at 21:01
Welcome to the Party!
I'll just pretend that I understand lines 3 an 4 of that :P

Fine fine fine! I'll go get one up for you :)
alexsayshi
 player, 48 posts
Sat 21 Jul 2018
at 20:32
Welcome to the Party!
I'll be getting something up tonight! Sorry about the delay again, I've been getting a lot of headaches and having a lot going on in my games
Storyteller
 GM, 50 posts
Sun 22 Jul 2018
at 19:16
Welcome to the Party!
No problem.  I had to stop running one game due to my work schedule.  Hopefully, I'll be able to get back to it soon.  Definitely understand life issues.
alexsayshi
 player, 49 posts
Sun 22 Jul 2018
at 23:22
Welcome to the Party!
Are you wanting to continue this little thing then?
Storyteller
 GM, 51 posts
Tue 24 Jul 2018
at 03:10
Welcome to the Party!
I'm fine with this little learning session, I just couldn't keep up with three players posting daily in a full fledged game.

And I wasn't going to go crazy here, just to the point where you meet the Prince with a chance to use disciplines along the way.
alexsayshi
 player, 50 posts
Tue 24 Jul 2018
at 03:12
Welcome to the Party!
Alright :) I just didnít want you to feel like you had to keep doing this for me if you had other stuff to do
Storyteller
 GM, 52 posts
Tue 24 Jul 2018
at 04:03
Welcome to the Party!
Nah. This isn't too much. :)

I was just thinking of a couple more things... A chance to use some disciplines and maybe a short fight just so you can see that in action.