RTJ and Character creation info.   Posted by The Chronicler.Group: archive 0
The Chronicler
 GM, 25 posts
Wed 15 Jul 2015
at 02:48
RTJ and Character creation info
All characters are members of the Northside Tunnel runners a midsize gang of mudlarks that robs anchored ships and and arranges shipwrecks around the northeast docks, and fences it through the shadowport black market for a tidy profit, well a reasonable profit after all the the dues are paid to the Shadowport Syndicate by way of the Gilded Thorns, as well as Bribes to the customs officials, and protection against the Constabulary

All characters start as level 3 rogues or as a multiclass rogue

All characters must have at least 1 point positive relationship with the Prince of Shadows

Please submit an idea of what type of character you wish to play, along with confirmation that you have read the house rules

Update for applying players

New characters must be a resident or visitor to shadowport, with a strong inclination towards criminality.

New characters need to be a caster with a a good story for why a non-rogue would is interested in thievery and the criminal underworld, or a caster/rogue

All player characters start as level 4

All player characters must have at least 1 point positive relationship with the Prince of Shadows

This message was last edited by the GM at 16:25, Mon 10 Aug 2015.

The Chronicler
 GM, 26 posts
Wed 15 Jul 2015
at 02:53
Re: RTJ and Character Creation Info
Example of a Character sheet, you don't have to use this one, but you do need to have all of this information represented I an orderly layout so I can find it.

quote:
13th Age CHARACTER SHEET
Name:                                               Race:
Class:                                                Level:3

    Score  Mod  Mod+Level
STR                                                Armor Class (AC):
CON                                                Physical Defense (PD):
DEX                                                Mental Defense (MD):
INT                                                Hit Points:
WIS                                                Recoveries:
CHA                                                Recovery Roll:
                                                   Initiative:



ONE UNIQUE THING:


ICON RELATIONSHIPS:                                     BACKGROUNDS



Basic Melee Attack

Basic Ranged Attack

Racial Power



TALENTS/Feats


Spells

GEAR

The Chronicler
 GM, 32 posts
Wed 15 Jul 2015
at 19:14
Re: RTJ and Character Creation Info
Resources

If you only have access to the 13th age SRD that is enough to get you by just fine.
(http://www.13thagesrd.com/)

I have all the books, and 13th age monthly and can lend you sections if you wish. I'll post the rules for multi-classing below, as well as the Multi-class Feat list.

If you're interested in playing a multi class with one of the classes from the expansion
(chaos mage, commander, druid, monk, necromancer, or occultist. And by the way the game designers do not recommend multi-classing rogues with the commander or occultist because the mechanics do not mesh well together, but maybe we can work something out.)

I have those available for you as well.
The Chronicler
 GM, 33 posts
Wed 15 Jul 2015
at 19:24
Re: RTJ and Character Creation Info
BASICS
(I recommend using CTRL+F to find what you're looking for)

Here’s the guide to creating a multiclass character. If there’s an
element of character class configuration we don’t mention, you can
assume that it works the same for multiclass characters as it does
for single-class characters. The specific rules in the class-by-class
section trump these general rules, so you’ll need to check the entries
for both your classes to make sure you’ve seen all the options.
This is a long checklist, so let’s call out what are probably
the three most important sections below: Level Progression
covers how many powers/spells you get and when (hint: one level
behind); Key Ability Scores & Key Modifiers explains the math of
most of your multiclass character’s attacks; and Weapon Damage
explains how multiclass characters take a damage penalty.
Terminology: Your multiclass is a combination of your two
classes separated by a slash. There’s no significance to the order.
A fighter/wizard is the same as a wizard/fighter; you can call
yourself whichever sounds better to you.

And since we’re being precise about terminology, let’s
acknowledge that our version of multiclassing could be called
“dual-classing.” We are not presenting rules for combining three
or more classes, only two. To dabble with the feel of three or more
classes, use a talent from a class like the bard, paladin, ranger,
sorcerer, or necromancer to grab a spell from a third class.
Level progression: Given the various multiclassing systems
in d20-rolling fantasy games over the years, we should be clear
that you gain levels like any other character. When you level up
to be, say, a 3rd level fighter/wizard, you’re a 3rd level character,
with 3rd level hit points and three feats (unless you’re human,
in which case you’ve got four). You add your level (3) to your
attacks, to your defenses, and to your skill checks. You level up
as fast as other characters and you never have to worry about
gaining specific or separate class levels.

On the other hand, it’s not true to say that you level up
like a single-class character. Multiclass characters have the
class powers, attacks, maneuvers, bonus talents, and spells of a
character that is one level lower than their actual level.
For example, as a 3rd level fighter/wizard, you’ll use the fighter
and wizard level progression tables for 2nd level. In this example,
as a fighter, you’ll know 4 maneuvers and they’ll all still have to be
from the 1st level pool. As a wizard, you’ll know six 1st level spells.
At 4th level, you then gain the maneuvers of a single-class 3rd level
fighter and the spells of a single-class 3rd level wizard.
What you get as a 1st level multiclass character: Each
multiclass option in the class-by-class list’s level progression
sections tells you what you get as a 1st level character when your
class abilities are a level lower.

Talents as a 1st level character: Choose one talent from
each of your two class choices. Then choose your third talent
from either of those classes.

Bonus talents as part of class progression: If your class gets
bonus talents (barbarian, commander, fighter, monk, occultist,
paladin, ranger), you still get them, but at one level later than a
single-class character does.

Class features: Many classes contribute all of their class
features to a multiclass. Others only allow some class features, or
limit you from taking some talents or feats. The details are in the
class-by-class multiclass list on page 108.
Ability score bonuses at character creation: You can
select your ability score class bonus from the options available
to either of your classes. For example, if you are a fighter/wizard,
you can gain a single +2 class bonus to Strength, Constitution,
Intelligence, or Wisdom.

Key ability scores & key modifiers: To be fully effective,
multiclass characters have to be good in at least two ability
scores, generally one for each class. (Classes that already care a
lot about two attack abilities may find they care seriously about
three important ability scores but the key ability modifier we’re
handling here only deals with two scores per multiclass combo.)
A multiclass character uses a special modifier for most of
their attacks and other powers, called the key modifier. This
modifier is the lower of two ability modifiers determined by your
particular class combination. You use the key modifier whenever
you would use either of those two ability scores for an attack or
an effect of powers or spells.

It’s worth noting that you don’t necessarily use the key
modifier for all attacks, only for attacks that would normally use
one of the two ability scores in question. For example, a bard/
cleric whose key modifier is Wis/Cha would use that modifier
for all their spell attacks based on Wisdom or Charisma, but that
character would still make cleric melee attacks with Strength,
and bard melee attacks with Strength too if they’re smart.
You don’t use the key ability scores for skill checks. Skill
checks live outside the class framework and use your normal
ability scores, though if both scores are equal you will not notice
the difference.

The Key Modifier table on page 107 lists the modifier
relevant to each multiclass combination. For example, a rogue/
wizard’s primary abilities are Dexterity and Intelligence, so that
character’s key modifier is the lower of the character’s Dexterity
and Intelligence modifiers. You’ll use this key modifier in place
of any Dexterity modifier or Intelligence modifier you use for
all attacks, powers, spells, and class features or effects from the
rogue or wizard class. (It’s worth noting that core character stats
like AC, PD, MD, and Initiative are not considered elements of
your class, so they use the normal ability modifiers rather than
the key modifiers.)

If you’re using the point-buy system for your ability scores,
you’ll probably want to set up your character so that the modifiers
for the two base abilities of your key modifier are the same. For
example, if your rogue/wizard’s Dexterity and Intelligence scores
are both 18, then you’ll use a +4 modifier for all your Dex and Int
attacks/powers/spells, just like normal. When the modifiers are
the same, the “lower of the two” rule can be ignored since they
are the same.

The table on page 107 lists the key modifier ability scores.
A couple classes that offer choices of which ability score to use
for melee attacks ended up with a choice of key ability scores as
well—bard and ranger, we’re looking at you.
Basic attacks: You have the basic attacks from both your
classes. Of course, many classes have abilities or flexible attacks

that key off using a basic attack from that class. It’s also possible
that your ability scores suggest that one of your basic attacks is
better than the other—that’s fine, but each time you make a basic
attack you’ll have to specify which class you are using. Some
players choose a default attack mode and only call out exceptions.
Hit Points: Your hit points are the average of your two
classes. For example, a fighter gets a base of 8 + Constitution
modifier hit points while a rogue gets a base of 6 + Constitution
modifier hit points. A fighter/rogue would therefore get 7 +
Constitution modifier hit points. A fighter/bard would average
8 and 7 and would end up with 7.5 + Constitution modifier hit
points as a base before multiplying that value by the modifier
listed on the level progression chart. After multiplying, round
fractions down.

Recovery dice: Average the dice from both classes, then
round up to the next higher die size. Since the usual recovery dice
are d6, d8, and d10, the outcomes that might not be immediately
clear look like this: d6 + d8 = d8; d6 + d10 = d8; d6 + d12 = d10;
d8 + d10 = d10; d8 + d12 = d10; d10 + d12 = d12.

Armor and AC: The good news is you use the highest base
AC provided by either of your classes for whichever type of
armor you are wearing. The bad news is that attack penalties for
wearing shields or heavy armor while using attacks and spells
from classes that have penalties fighting in heavy armor or with
shields don’t go away. For example, a 1st level wizard/fighter has a
base AC of 16 in heavy armor from the fighter class. But while the
character’s fighter attacks would be fine, any of the character’s
wizard attacks (yes including spells) would take a –2 penalty:
wizard attacks aren’t intended to be used easily while wearing
heavy armor. Since only cleric, fighter, and paladin attacks don’t
take a penalty from heavy armor (barring occasional talents
from classes like the commander), you should be cautious about
multiclassing your way into heavy armor.

The armor-centered classes, fighter and paladin, offer
potential ways around this problem.

PD & MD: Use the best PD and MD from either of your
classes. Yes, a rogue/wizard ends up with a base PD of 12 and
base MD of 12.

Weapon attacks: You get the benefit of using the better
weapon attack abilities among your two classes.

Weapon damage penalty: Most multiclass characters
must drop all of their weapon damage dice down one step. That
means d12s become d10s; d10s become d8s; d8s become d6s; d6s
become d4s; and d4s stay as d4s.

This reduction does NOT apply if your multiclass contains
only classes from the following list of skillful warriors: barbarian,
bard, commander, fighter, paladin, ranger, rogue.

If you’re one of the many multiclass characters affected by
the weapon damage penalty, it applies only to your own attacks,
not to the attacks of animal companions, summoned creatures,
and the like.

The reduction also applies when you’ve found a way to gain
a larger weapon damage die temporarily. For instance, a cleric
casting the hammer of faith spell would get to use d12 damage
dice for the rest of the battle, but a fighter/cleric (or any other
cleric multiclass) would have to use d10 damage dice with the
spell—still an improvement, but not as big a one.

Feats: You can choose feats from either of your classes. You
gain one feat per level like everyone else.

Gear: As a 1st level character, you’ve got all the gear you need
from both your classes, as well as the normal starting gold pieces.
(That’s the normal starting gold of a single character, not two
characters combined, you greedy adventurer you.)
The Chronicler
 GM, 34 posts
Wed 15 Jul 2015
at 19:53
Re: RTJ and Character Creation Info
CLASS BY CLASS MULTICLASSING
(This is the basic info on the strengths and weakness of each type of multi-class. It also has available feats that allow multi-class characters to function more smoothly, if you multi-class it is highly recommended that you take one or more of these feats to start.)

The notes below explain exactly what you do or do not get when
you’ve chosen a class as part of a multiclass.
We’ve written these notes with an eye toward the mechanics
rather than digging into the stories that can drive each multiclass.
We were tempted to write story sections for many possibilities,
but in the end we opted to let you work out combos and
compelling stories for yourself.

Barbarian Multiclass
While the barbarian is a good class for players new to the game,
experienced players may enjoy the class more when it’s mixed
with a class that has more options.
Level progression: Dropping a level behind on class elements
isn’t much of a problem for a multiclass barbarian, who still gets
to start with three talents. But it does slow down the level at
which you’ll get your bonus talents. You won’t get the barbarian’s
normal bonus talents at 5th and 8th level, instead receiving them
at 6th level and 9th level.
Rage gets in the way: Rage is a jealous state of mind. While
raging, you usually cannot use attacks, powers, or spells from
another class. But there’s a way around that. . . .
Controlled Rage
Adventurer Tier: You can use powers and attacks from your
other class while raging. You can’t use the extra d20 that
Barbarian Rage gives you while making an attack from the
other class, but at least you can slip out of your rage long
enough to use a power or attack from your other class.
Champion Tier: Once per battle while raging, you can use a
melee attack from your other class as if it was a barbarian
attack, rolling 2d20 for the attack. (Examples of possible uses
include a bard’s flexible attack battle cries, a commander
attack using the Lead from the Front talent that will garner
command points, a fighter’s flexible attacks, a ranger’s
double melee attack, and so on.)

Bard Multiclass
Traditionally, the bard has been a class that dabbles in other
classes’ business. We portrayed that in the 13th Age core rulebook
with the Jack of Spells talent, which you’re free to use in
combination with a multiclass if that’s how you roll. Note that
the Jack of Spells advantages would only apply to spells jacked by
the talent, not to spells known through the multiclass.
Level progression: You lag one level behind in the battle cries
and spells/songs known columns of the Bard Level Progression table.
As a 1st level bard, you start with only one 1st level battle cry
and one 1st level spell or song.
As usual, the Battle Skald or Spellsinger talents could still add
a battle cry or spell/song to what you’re getting as a multiclass bard.
Flexible options: If you multiclass with another class that
has flexible attacks, such as the fighter or a druid that takes that
talent, consider the two feats that follow. Without the feats, you
must always declare whether you are using a bard flexible attack
or a flexible attack from your other class.
True Flexibility
Adventurer Tier: Once per battle, as long as both classes use
flexible attacks for the type of attack you are making, you
can choose to roll a flexible attack without deciding which of
your two classes it is linked to. Choose from all your flexible
attacks after you see the result of the roll.
Champion Tier: You can now use the adventurer-tier feat
twice per battle.

Chaos Mage Multiclass
One of the consequences of having classes that are drastically
different than other classes is that they may not integrate well.
The chaos mage is weird. So are its multiclass incarnations.
Level progression: You lag one level behind in the three
central columns of the Chaos Mage Level Progression table: daily
spells, once-per-battle spells, and spell level.
Since the chaos mage is new in this book, we’ve added a
multiclass entry to the level progression table that shows what
you’ll get as a crazed 1st level chaos mage who multiclasses.
A new stone: Drop three new stones of the same color (but
a different color from your attack/defense/iconic stones) into
your chaos mage bag. These stones correspond to your other
class. When you draw one of the stones, any warp effects or high
weirdness you’ve got going on from a previous chaos mage turn
end. On your next turn, you must use a standard action attack
from your non-chaos mage class, just as if you had drawn a stone
for one of your standard three types of chaos magic.
If your chaos mage talents allow you to draft random spells
from other classes (Stench of Necromancy, Touch of Wizardry,
Trace of the Divine, and Whiff of Sorcery), those spells remain
with the attack or defense slots you assigned them to as usual.
Yes, you could be a chaos mage/necromancer with the chaos
mage talent Stench of Necromancy.
Continual Warp
Adventurer Tier: If you have a warp effect already going,
drawing the stone from your other class doesn’t cancel the
warp effect. The warp effect continues until it’s replaced by
another warp effect or the end of the battle, as usual.
Champion Tier: If you invested in high weirdness, happy day:
your high weirdness effects don’t stop when you draw a
multiclass stone.

Cleric Multiclass
The cleric makes an interesting multiclass character. Healing is a
welcome addition to any party, domain invocations can reshape
each battle, and many of the cleric’s good spells only require
quick actions, letting the character use a standard action for an
attack from a class that’s focused on combat.

We think the cleric is a wonderful multiclass, so much that we’re not
giving it any new feats to make it even more fun. Level progression: You lag one
level behind in the spells known columns of the Cleric Level Progression table.
As a 1st level multiclass cleric, you start with three 1st level spells.

Commander Multiclass
The commander makes an interesting multiclass
character because the actions that define the class
don’t necessarily get in the way of using standard
action attacks from a different class. Quick
action tactics and interrupt action commands
leave room for a standard action spell. The issue
is that you won’t gain command points via the
Fighting from the Front class feature when making
attacks from other classes, so you’ll either have to pick
your moments or focus more on tactics by default.
Level progression: You lag one level behind in the
class-specific elements of the Commander Level Progression
table—so it only affects the number of commands and tactics
you have and the pool you can draw them from.
Since the commander is new in this book, we’ve added a
multiclass entry to the level progression table that shows what
you’ll get as a 1st level multiclass commander.
Finding your command: It’s no fun to fight well and never
get any command points. So take the next feat when you decide
to multiclass with another melee combat class and want a bit of
flexibility during combat.
Many Fronts
Adventurer Tier: Once per battle, use a melee attack from
your non-commander class in place of a commander attack
when you use your Front Line Fighting feature.
Champion Tier: You can now use the adventurer-tier feat
twice per battle.

Druid Multiclass
The druid makes a fascinating multiclass puzzle. The class is versatile
and uses its talents as its source of power. A multiclass druid has to
use at least one talent for its other class, which by definition makes
your druidic side less powerful and versatile. If you see this as a
challenge, or you have a great story you want to show off, go for it.
There are other classes that offer multiclass feats that might
work well with druidic abilities or spells, but the druid itself
doesn’t offer any.

Level progression: You lag one level behind in the powers and
spells known columns of the Druid Level Progression tables.
Since the druid is new in this book, we’ve added a multiclass
entry to the level progression tables that show what you’ll get as
a 1st level multiclass druid.

Fighter Multiclass
One temptation with the fighter will be to roll an attack from
another class, then wish you had said it was a fighter attack so
that you could use a good flexible attack maneuver. To avoid the
temptation, consider multiclassing with a class like wizard that
overlaps less with the fighter’s melee skills.
Level progression: You lag one level behind on two columns
of the Fighter Level Progression Table that matter. You’re one
level down in: Maneuvers Known and Maneuver Pool Available.
You also won’t get the fighter’s normal bonus talent at 6th level,
instead receiving it at 7th level.
As a 1st level multiclass fighter, you start knowing two
maneuvers from the 1st level pool.
Getting around the armor problem: If your other class has
attacks that don’t work well when you’re wearing heavy armor,
consider the following feat.
Armored Warfare
Adventurer Tier: Once per battle while wearing heavy armor,
use an attack from a class that normally takes an attack penalty
while wearing heavy armor without taking that penalty.
Champion Tier: You can now ignore heavy armor attack
penalties while the escalation die is 3+.


Monk Multiclass
We considered saying that the monk doesn’t multiclass. We
could explain that in terms of all-consuming discipline necessary
for the monk’s way. But in truth, we already designed elements
of the monk class, like the Focus talent, around the idea that a
monk might use Focus to preserve its place in its attack form
progression in order to use a standard action attack from another
class. Therefore we’re not going to feel bad about avoiding
any other feats that make it easy for the monk to multiclass.
Remember that if you don’t use Focus, you’ll lose your place in
your monk attack form progression.
So the fair way to put it would be like so: the monk’s
discipline is nearly all-consuming, but a monk who doesn’t mind
losing some of their monastic skills can multiclass and see how
far it gets them. At least you’ll still have the two ability score
bonuses from the monk class.
Level progression: You lag one level behind in the all
important columns of the Monk Level Progression table: class
talents, forms, and ki.
Since the monk is new in this book, we’ve added a multiclass
entry to the level progression table that shows what you’ll get as
a 1st level multiclass monk.
Monk attacks also take a damage penalty: The multiclass
monk’s JAB, PUNCH, and KICK attacks damage dice decrease
one size just like the WEAPON attacks of all classes. Yes, this
means your JAB dice are d4s, PUNCH dice are d6s, and KICK
dice are d8s.

Necromancer Multiclass
Necromancy is the bomb. Who doesn’t want a flaming skeletal
minion? Well, one answer is high hit point classes like the
fighter and paladin who would rather have the hit points a high
Constitution yields instead of off-loading them onto a minion.
The necromancer’s Wasting Away class feature gets in the way of
Constitution and hit points.
Level progression: You lag one level behind in the spells
known columns of the Necromancer Level Progression table.
Since the necromancer is new in this book, we’ve added a
multiclass entry to the level progression table that shows what
you’ll get as a 1st level multiclass necromancer. (It’s three 1st level
spells, by the way.)

Occultist Multiclass
So wait a moment: you are the occultist, the only one in the
world. And you’re also a multiclass? Well, okay. It’s your unique
story and you can do as you like. Let’s look at the core decisions
you’ll face when you’re playing an occultist multiclass.
Your standards are claimed: You gain the focus required to
use a serious occultist spell by using your standard action during
your turn to set that up. That gets in the way of using powers and
spells from many other classes, though there’s nothing unusual
about a multiclass character feeling tension between its classes.
When you’re focused, you’re focused: But when you have your
occultist focus, you don’t get to use actions and powers and spells
from other classes. It’s the tightly controlled equivalent of barbarian
rage, a state of mind that has trouble opening to other paths. Then
again, as for the barbarian, there is a feat that opens the path.
Bad options, good options: Because of the occultist’s
reliance on interrupt actions, the commander and rogue look
like classes that the occultist should avoid even if you see a
compelling story there. The cleric on the other hand, with quick
action spells that you can cast before using your standard action
to gain your focus, might work out.
Level progression: You lag one level behind in the spells
known columns of the Occultist Level Progression table. You also
won’t get the occultist’s normal bonus talents at 5th level and 8th
level, instead receiving them at 6th level and 9th level.
Since the occultist is new in this book, we’ve added a
multiclass entry to the level progression table that shows what
you’ll get as the 1st level multiclass occultist.
Avoiding being too focused: If you’d like to be able to use
powers, spells, and effects from other classes while you’re using
your occultist focus, take the feat below.
Wider Focus
Adventurer Tier: Once per battle, you can use a power, spell,
or other effect from a different class while maintaining your
occultist focus.


Paladin Multiclass
Paladin is a great multiclass option if your other class is already
comfortable in heavy armor. If your other class doesn’t fight well
in heavy armor, you may either act as a paladin in light armor, as
a spellcaster in heavy armor who mainly casts non-attack spells,
or some other path we’re willing to let you discover.
Level progression: As a class that’s really only getting
bonus talents from its class-specific progression, you don’t lose
much as a multiclass paladin. You won’t get the paladin’s normal
bonus talents at 5th and 8th level, instead receiving them at 6th
level and 9th level.
The armor problem: If your other class has attacks that don’t
work well when you’re wearing heavy armor, consider the following
feat. It’s a touch different than the multiclass fighter’s version.
Armored in Life
Adventurer Tier: Once per battle while wearing heavy armor,
use an attack from a class that normally takes an attack penalty
while wearing heavy armor without taking that penalty.
Champion Tier: Two battles per day, avoid all attack penalties
for wearing heavy armor from a class that normally has
such an attack penalty. During any other battles that day,
you can still only use the once-per battle power from the
adventurer-tier feat.

Ranger Multiclass
If you’re willing to spend two talents on the ranger’s animal
companion, it has no problem fighting for you while you use
powers and attacks from either of your classes.
Level progression: Like the paladin, your Level Progression
table doesn’t have many class-specific elements. You won’t get
the ranger’s normal bonus talents at 5th and 8th level, instead
receiving them at 6th level and 9th level.

Double attacks: Unless you’ve multiclassed with one of the
other skilled weapon-using classes, your damage dice for the
Double Melee Attack and Double Ranged Attack talents drop
down another size (usually from d6s to d4s) as a multiclass ranger.
Fighting with two weapons: From a mechanics standpoint,
mixing the double attack talents with attacks from other classes
doesn’t work well, but your Two-Weapon Mastery talent works
just fine if you choose one of the two adventurer-tier feats below.
Extending the ranger’s Archery talent: Similarly, there’s
another adventurer-tier feat below that makes your Archery
talent relevant to your multiclass.
Two-weapon Multiclass
Adventurer Tier: While you are fighting with two melee
weapons, you now gain the benefit of your Two-Weapon
Mastery talent and any feats you’ve taken for it even when
using attacks from your non-ranger class.
Adventurer Tier: You can use your Archery ranger talent and
any feats you’ve taken for it even when using ranged attacks
from your non-ranger class.


Rogue Multiclass
Multiclassing suits the rogue’s fondness for breaking in where
they’re not expected. Also keep in mind that your Momentum class
feature means you won’t multiclass that well with other classes
that use interrupt actions, like the commander and the occultist.
Level progression: You lag one level behind in the
Powers Known and Pool Available columns of the Rogue Level
Progression table.
At 1st level, you know 3 powers, all of them from the 1st
level pool.
No double sneak: Combining your Sneak Attack damage
with attacks from other classes remains off-limits. On the other
hand, it seems fair for a rogue to sometimes gain momentum with
non-rogue attacks through the following feats.
Seize the Momentum
Adventurer Tier: Once per day when you hit with an attack
from your non-rogue class, you can gain momentum as if
you had used a rogue attack.
Champion Tier: In addition to using the adventurer-tier feat
once per day, you can also use it once per battle (so in a fourbattle
day, you could use it five times).

Sorcerer Multiclass
Experienced players sometimes say that playing a sorcerer would be
more fun if it had more versatility. Multiclassing can fit that demand.
Level progression: You lag one level behind in the spells
known columns of the Sorcerer Level Progression table.
At 1st level, you know three 1st level spells.
Diverse gathering: Gathering power is a signature sorcerer
move. The following feats let you apply it to spell damage from
your other class.
Diverse Gathering
Adventurer Tier: Once per day, you can cast a non-sorcerer
spell after you have gathered power. You double the damage
of the spell as if it were a sorcerer spell.
Champion Tier: You can now also gather power for a nonsorcerer
spell as per the adventurer-tier feat once per battle
while the escalation die is 4+ (so in a four battle day, you could
use it up to five times assuming the escalation die allows it).

Wizard Multiclass
In a world once ruled by the Wizard King and now protected
by the Archmage, wizardry has a reputation as the style of
magic that can get you ahead. Wizards wield a whole mess of
spell power and don’t require any special options to help them
function better as a multiclass.
Level progression: You lag one level behind in the spells
known columns of the Wizard Level Progression table.
At 1st level, you know four 1st level spells.

This message was last edited by the GM at 16:02, Thu 16 July 2015.