Albert's Draw, 6 April 1947.   Posted by Directorate Committee.Group: 0
Directorate Committee
 GM, 10 posts
Thu 17 Sep 2015
at 02:44
Albert's Draw, 6 April 1947
The Beefsteak Club of 9 Irving Street is much like the other gentlemens' clubs of London: the smell of cigarette and cigar smoke clings tight to the air and the leather upholstry, there are muffled guffaws as the chairs' occupants, often as musty as their surroundings, gossip and grumble between one another. Also like many clubs, the attendants share a single name, Charles in this case, and amble between the patrons fulfilling their whims.

Unlike most other clubs, however, this one was welcoming to Mr. Albert Worthington-Smythe. The Beefsteak might be his last option. He didn't qualify for many of the remaining clubs, and neither the Guards' nor The Rag had  borne any fruit.

(You can continue the narration from here. You have, more or less, complete narrative control except in describing how an NPC feels or thinks.)
Albert Worthington-Smythe
 player, 3 posts
Thu 17 Sep 2015
at 13:59
Albert's Draw, 6 April 1947
The young man checked his suit, it was the latest fashion, adjusted the trousers slightly and settled himself into a corner seat. He looked around and withdrew a cigarette from a silver case and flicked his lighter twice, failing to get it to take on the first try. He was early and waiting always made him nervous. And the reason he was early? He was worried about the meeting and it simply wouldn't do to be late. A vicious circle really and he needed this to go well. There were too many people in London who knew him. He needed to get out.

A Charles approached. The Charles who fetched drinks, not the Charles who politely reminded patrons that the club kept a selection of the less garish ties for just such an emergency, had sir's man been unduly rushed this morning? Albert was grateful for small mercies and ordered himself a large brandy.

As he sipped his drink an older man approached, bearded, overweight and in a slightly crumpled jacket with trousers which didn't quite match. The Charleses made no comment, they were no fools. Albert stood and offered his hand. “So good of you to meet me Sir. Can I offer you a drink?”

“Water, with ice. Keeps the mind clear. Now what is it you want? Get to the point. I don't have time to waste.”

Albert silently regretted his brandy this was not a promising start.
Directorate Committee
 GM, 15 posts
Thu 17 Sep 2015
at 15:49
Albert's Draw, 6 April 1947
The man sitting before him was LtCol Lawrence Martin Taylor, 153rd Leicestershire Yeomanry, Ret. OBE etc.

The good Lieutenant Colonel was trimmer and better kept the last Albert had seen him, in December of 44. The end of the war had not been kind to him. Fixing Albert with a critical eye he growls, "Well? Out with it, Smythe."

This message was last edited by the GM at 15:50, Thu 17 Sept 2015.

Albert Worthington-Smythe
 player, 4 posts
Sat 19 Sep 2015
at 20:47
Albert's Draw, 6 April 1947
“You know me sir. You know I can be relied on to get the job done when a job needs doing, quietly if necessary. And that is the thing, I need a posting, abroad. I understand you are looking for people, I don't know what for, no one seems to, but we both know I could be a useful man to have involved, a loyal man.”

Albert was rushing his speech, he knew he was, but when the Colonel was in this kind of mood he had no patience for delay. That was a good thing though. The man would have never agreed to the meeting if he wasn't prepared to offer something, the only question was what he was going to offer and how much it would cost.
Directorate Committee
 GM, 28 posts
Mon 21 Sep 2015
at 07:15
Albert's Draw, 6 April 1947
Taylor gives the younger man a once-over before offering his reply.


[We should roll now. So add up your influence with whatever traits you want to bring in and your trust, since it doesn't sound like you're using any tools. He trusts you at about 2, though potentially at only a 1 depending on what impression you made on him during the war. So you are rolling at least 6 dice.

If you want to bring in one of your negative traits, remember that will give you an extra die but if it is the highest number you roll something bad related to it happens. As a consequence, please roll it separately so I can be sure of what it rolls.

I will be rolling against yours with Taylor's Reason attribute, plus other traits which I won't go into.]
Albert Worthington-Smythe
 player, 5 posts
Mon 21 Sep 2015
at 13:15
Albert's Draw, 6 April 1947
In reply to Directorate Committee (msg # 5):

[OOC] No relevant traits, no Tools :<. I need to work out how to guide things the way of useful stuff. On the other hand it was a pretty good roll so Albert has hope of not being embarrassed too badly.

14:09, Today: Albert Worthington-Smythe rolled 41 using 6d10 with rolls of 9, 8, 8, 8, 6 & 2.  Albert's draw v's LtCol Taylor. [/OOC]
Directorate Committee
 GM, 29 posts
Mon 21 Sep 2015
at 13:55
Albert's Draw, 6 April 1947
[I can see all your rolls, even the secret ones. I can also roll on your behalf if need be. As it happens you got 3 successes. Your 9s cancelled out and his next highest roll was a 7. I can write something out later or, if you want, you can close out the scene yourself]

This message was last edited by the GM at 14:12, Mon 21 Sept 2015.

Albert Worthington-Smythe
 player, 8 posts
Mon 21 Sep 2015
at 14:29
Albert's Draw, 6 April 1947
In reply to Directorate Committee (msg # 7):

[OOC] I'll close it out. next few hours probably. [/OOC]
Albert Worthington-Smythe
 player, 9 posts
Mon 21 Sep 2015
at 18:34
Albert's Draw, 6 April 1947
In reply to Albert Worthington-Smythe (msg # 8):

Eventually Taylor nods and smiles briefly, "Where was it you wanted to go?"

"I hear Paris is nice in the spring time, but anywhere out London would do."

"Paris I can't manage. How do you feel about Berlin?" The man withdraws a pencil and a nondescript card from an inside pocket. He scribbles an address on the back. "Take this, ask for Margaret. She'll give you some forms to fill in but don't worry I make sure the right people see them."

Albert is effusive with his thanks, shaking the Colonels hand and asking if there is anythinghe can do, but Taylor shakes him off. "Must be going, things to do."

Almost as an after thought he adds. "Albert, make sure to pack some sturdy boots, you'll need them."