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Investigator Occupations.

Posted by der WachterFor group 0
der Wachter
GM, 10 posts
45 years of RPGs
Ich bin dein Freund.
Thu 3 Nov 2022
at 01:42
  • msg #1

Investigator Occupations

The following occupations from Chapter Four of the Investigator Handbook are particularly well-suited for this story:
Prostitute (male or female), Criminal/Gangster, Artist/Photographer, Journalist/Author,  Dilettante/Gentry, Entertainer/Musician, Clergy, Occultist, Parapsychologist.

Credit Rating
You get the lower limit of the Credit Rating range for your occupation for nothing. You may then spend Personal experience points to increase the CR up to the maximum for the occupation.
This message was last edited by the GM at 02:28, Thu 03 Nov 2022.
der Wachter
GM, 11 posts
45 years of RPGs
Ich bin dein Freund.
Thu 3 Nov 2022
at 01:44
  • msg #2

Investigator Occupations - Prostitute

Depending on circumstance, breeding, and background, a prostitute may be a high-rolling expensive call girl, male gigolo, or streetwalker. Often driven by circumstance, many dream of a way out. A few work completely independently; however, for most, they are lured and kept in the business by ruthless pimps whose only concern is cash.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 2 + APP × 2
Credit Rating: 10–25
Suggested Contacts: petty criminals, low-ranked police, organized crime, suitors (johns)
Skills: Art/Craft (any), two interpersonal skills (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Dodge, Psychology, Sleight of hand, Stealth, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.
This message was last edited by the GM at 01:48, Thu 03 Nov 2022.
der Wachter
GM, 12 posts
45 years of RPGs
Ich bin dein Freund.
Thu 3 Nov 2022
at 01:46
  • msg #3

Investigator Occupations - Criminal/Gangster

Burglar
Called a screen in local thieves’ cant, the burglar specializes in gaining surreptitious entrance to a business or residence and stealing valuables.
Occupation Skill Points: DEX × 4
Credit Rating: 10–45
Suggested Contacts: petty criminals, low-ranked police, organized crime, fence
Skills: Appraise, Climb, Locksmith, one interpersonal skills (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Spot Hidden, Sleight of Hand, any two other skills as personal or era specialty.

Conman
Confidence tricksters are usually smooth talkers. They descend on individuals or communities, fleecing their targets of their hard-earned savings or tonight’s food money. In this setting, they tend to run short cons, simple affairs requiring just the lone grifter and no more than a few minutes.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 2 + APP × 2
Credit Rating: 10–45
Suggested Contacts: petty criminals, low-ranked police, organized crime, marks.
Skills: Appraise, Art/Craft (Acting), Law or Other Language, Listen, two interpersonal skills (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Psychology, Sleight of Hand.

Forger/Counterfeiter
Forgers are the artists of the criminal world, specializing in forging official documents, deeds and transfers, and providing phony signatures, manufacturing fake identification papers for petty criminals or illegal immigrants, or counterfeiting currency.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 4
Credit Rating: 10–45
Suggested Contacts: petty criminals, low-ranked police, organized crime, customers.
Skills: Accounting, Appraise, Art/Craft (Forgery), History, Library Use, Spot Hidden, Sleight of Hand,
any one other skill as personal or era specialty.

Pickpocket
The dipper is a specialist, working alone or with a team that might include one or more stalls to distract their mark or interfere with pursuit and a stooge to take the handoff so the dipper isn’t caught with the goods.
Occupation Skill Points: DEX × 4
Credit Rating: 10–35
Suggested Contacts: petty criminals, low-ranked police, organized crime, accomplices.
Skills: Appraise, Art/Craft (Acting), two interpersonal skills (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Spot Hidden, Sleight of Hand, any two other skills as personal or era specialty.

Gambler
Gamblers are the dandies of the criminal world. Sharp dressers, they usually possess bags of charm, either earthy or sophisticated. Whether frequenting the racetrack, card table, or casino, such individuals often base their life upon chance. More sophisticated gamblers probably frequent the illegal casinos operated by organized crime. A few are known as poker players and are often involved in lengthy, high-stakes games where they may even be backed by outside investors. The lowest frequent alleys and dives, playing craps with loaded dice, or hustling in pool halls.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 2 + (APP × 2 or DEX × 2)
Credit Rating: 8–45
Suggested Contacts: petty criminals, low-ranked police, organized crime, competitors.
Skills: Accounting, Art/Craft (Acting), two interpersonal skills (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Listen, Psychology, Sleight of Hand, Spot Hidden

Street Tough
Young street hoodlums, usually not part of an organized gang, looking for a chance to hook-up with real gangsters. Experience is probably limitedto shoplifting, smash-and-grab, mugging, and house breaking. They might be used as look outs or mules by established gangs. They often engage in public drunkenness and brawling.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 2 + (DEX × 2 or STR × 2)
Credit Rating: 5–15
Suggested Contacts: petty criminals, low-ranked police, organized crime, fence
Skills: Climb, one interpersonal skill (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Fighting, Firearms, Jump, Sleight of Hand, Stealth, Throw

Underling/Thug
These are the frontline crooks in a larger operation, overseeing illicit shipments, collecting protection money or gambling debts, keeping other crooks in line, and so on.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 2 + (DEX × 2 or STR × 2)
Credit Rating: 5-25
Suggested Contacts: petty criminals, low-ranked police, organized crime, crew leader.
Skills: Drive Auto, Fighting, Brawl, two interpersonal skills (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Psychology, Stealth, Spot Hidden.
der Wachter
GM, 13 posts
45 years of RPGs
Ich bin dein Freund.
Thu 3 Nov 2022
at 01:47
  • msg #4

Investigator Occupations - Artist/Photographer

Artist
May be a painter, sculptor, etc. Sometimes self-absorbed and driven with a particular vision, sometimes blessed with a great talent that is able to inspire passion and understanding. Talented or not, the artist’s ego must be hardy and strong to surmount initial obstacles and critical appraisal, and to keep them working if success arrives. Some artists care not for material enrichment, while others have a keen entrepreneurial streak.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 2 + (DEX × 2 or POW × 2)
Credit Rating: 9–25
Suggested Contacts: gallery owners, art critics, wealthy patrons, media clients, models
Skills: Art/Craft (Drawing/Painting or Sculpture), History or Natural World, one interpersonal skill (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Other Language, Psychology, Spot Hidden, any two other skills as personal or era specialties.

Photographer
Photography as an art form has been around a long time, with most photographers working freelance, for an advertising firm, or in a portrait studio taking pictures of families. Others are employed in the newspaper, media, and film industries. The elite of photographers are drawn from the worlds of art, journalism, and wildlife conservation. In each of these arenas a photographer may find fame, recognition, and financial reward.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 4
Credit Rating: 9–25
Suggested Contacts: gallery owners, art critics, wealthy patrons, media clients, models
Skills: Art/Craft (Photography), one interpersonal skill (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuad), Psychology, Science (Chemistry), Stealth, Spot Hidden, any two other skills as personal or era specialties.
der Wachter
GM, 14 posts
45 years of RPGs
Ich bin dein Freund.
Thu 3 Nov 2022
at 01:50
  • msg #5

Investigator Occupations - Journalist/Writer

Photojournalist
Photojournalists are essentially reporters who use cameras, but who are also expected to write prose to accompany an image. In the 1920s, newsreels came into being; heavy, bulky 35mm film equipment was hauled around the globe in search of exciting news stories, sporting events, and bathing beauty pageants.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 4
Credit Rating: 9–25
Suggested Contacts: news industry, film industry, political organizations and government, business, law enforcement, criminals, high society
Skills: Art/Craft (Photography), Climb, one interpersonal skill (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Other Language, Psychology, Science (Chemistry), any two other skills as personal or era specialties.

Reporter
Reporters work in the news and media industries, either freelance or for a newspaper, magazine, website, or news agency. Most work outside of the office, interviewing witnesses, checking records, and gathering stories. Some are assigned to specific beats like the police station, the sports scene, or business. Others cover social events and garden club meetings.
Reporters carry press passes, but these are of little value other than to identify an individual as employed by their respective employer (usually a newspaper). The real work is similar to that of a private detective, and some reporters may resort to subterfuge to gain the information they want.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 4
Credit Rating: 9–25
Suggested Contacts: news industry, film industry, political organizations and government, business, law enforcement, criminals, high society.
Skills: Art/Craft (Acting), History, Listen, Own Language, one interpersonal skill (Charm, Fast Talk,
Intimidate, or Persuade), Psychology, Stealth, Spot Hidden.

Author
As distinct from the journalist, the author uses words to define and explore the human condition, especially the range of human emotions. Their labors are solitary and the rewards solipsistic: only a relative handful make much money in the present day, though in previous eras the trade once provided a regular living wage. The work habits of authors vary widely. Typically an author might
Typically, an author might spend months or years researching in preparation for a book, then withdrawing for periods of intense creation.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 4
Credit Rating: 9–45
Suggested Contacts: publishers, critics, historians, other writers
Skills: Art (Literature), History, Library Use, Natural World or Occult, Other Language, Own Language, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.
This message was last edited by the GM at 02:19, Thu 03 Nov 2022.
der Wachter
GM, 15 posts
45 years of RPGs
Ich bin dein Freund.
Thu 3 Nov 2022
at 02:22
  • msg #6

Investigator Occupations - Entertainer

Entertainer
This occupation might include clown, singer, dancer, comedian, juggler, musician, or anyone else who earns a living in front of an audience. These people love to be seen, love to show what they do best, and love the consequent applause. Previously to the 1920s, this profession lacked respect;
however, the money that Hollywood stars can make in the 1920s changes most minds, and by the present day such a background is generally felt to be an advantage.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 2 + APP × 2
Credit Rating: 9–30
Suggested Contacts: theatre people, film industry, entertainment critics, organized crime.
Skills: Art/Craft (e.g. Acting, Singer, Comedian, etc.), Disguise, two interpersonal skills (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Listen, Psychology, any two other skills as personal or era specialties.

Musician
May perform in an orchestra, group, or solo, with any instrument you care to think of. Getting noticed is hard and then getting a recording contract is difficult. Most musicians are poor and do not get
noticed, eking a living by playing small venues as often as they can. A fortunate few might get regular work, such as playing a piano in a bar or hotel or within a city orchestra. For the minority, great success and wealth can be found by being in the right place at the right time, plus having a modicum of talent. The 1920s is, of course, the Jazz Age, and musicians work in small combos and dance orchestras in large and medium-sized cities and towns across America. A few musicians living i n
large cities, like Chicago or New York, find steady work in their hometown, but most spend significant amounts of time on the road, touring either by bus, automobile, or by train.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 2 + (APP × 2 or DEX × 2)
Credit Rating: 9–30
Suggested Contacts: theatre people, film industry, entertainment critics, organized crime.
Skills: Art/Craft (Instrument), one interpersonal skill (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Listen, Psychology, any four other skills.
der Wachter
GM, 16 posts
45 years of RPGs
Ich bin dein Freund.
Thu 3 Nov 2022
at 02:26
  • msg #7

Investigator Occupations - Dilettante and Gentry

Dilettante
Dilettantes are self-supporting, living off an inheritance, trust fund, or some other source of income that does not require them to work. Usually, the dilettante has enough money that specialist financial advisers are needed to take care of it. Probably well educated, though not necessarily accomplished
in anything. Money frees the dilettante to be eccentric and outspoken. In the 1920s, some diettantes might be "flappers" or "sheiks"—as per the parlance of the time—of course, one didn't need to be rich to be a "party" person. In modern times, "hipster" might also be an appropriate term. The dilettante has had plenty of time to learn how to be charming and sophisticated; what else has been done with
that free time is likely to betray the dilettante’s true character and interests.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 2 + APP × 2
Credit Rating: 10-40
Suggested Contacts: fraternal organizations, bohemian circles, high society
Skills: Art/Craft (Any), Firearms, Other Language, Ride, one interpersonal skill (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), any three other skills as personal or era specialties.

Gentry
A man or woman of good breeding, courteous behavior, and good conduct. Usually the term is applied to a member of the upper class who is independently wealthy (either by inheritance or regular allowance). In the 1920s, such a person would certainly have had at least one servant (butler, valet, maid, chauffer) and probably a country and city residence. One does not necessarily have to be rich, as often family status is more important than family wealth in terms of the highest society.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 2 + APP × 2
Credit Rating: 10-40
Suggested Contacts: fraternal organizations, bohemian circles, high society.
Skills: Art/Craft (any), two interpersonal skills (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Firearms (Rifle/Shotgun), History, Other Language (any), Navigate, Ride.
der Wachter
GM, 17 posts
45 years of RPGs
Ich bin dein Freund.
Thu 3 Nov 2022
at 02:31
  • msg #8

Investigator Occupations - Clergy, Occultist, Parapsychologi

Clergy
The hierarchy of the Church usually assigns clergy to their respective parishes or sends them on evangelical missions, most often to a foreign country (see Missionary). Different churches have different priorities and hierarchies: for example, in the Catholic Church a priest may rise through the ranks of bishop, archbishop, and cardinal, while a Methodist pastor may in turn rise to district superintendent and bishop.
Many clergy (not just Catholic priests) bear witness to confessions and, though they are not at liberty to divulge such secrets, they are free to act upon them. Some who work in the church are trained in professional skills, acting as doctors, lawyers, and scholars—as appropriate, use the occupation template which best describes the nature of the investigator’s work.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 4
Credit Rating: 10–30
Suggested Contacts: Church hierarchy, local congregations, community leaders.
Skills: Accounting, History, Library Use, Listen, Other Language, one interpersonal skill (Charm,
Fast Talk, Intimidate, or Persuade), Psychology, any one other skill.

Occultist
Occultists are students of esoteric secrets and arcane magic. They fully believe in paranormal abilities and actively attempt to learn about and discover these powers within themselves. Most are familiar with a broad range of different philosophies and magical theories, some believing that they can actually perform feats of magic—the veracity of such abilities is left to the Keeper to determine.
It should be noted that, in the main, occultists are familiar with "earthly magic"—the secrets of Mythos magic are unknown to them, save in tantalizing hints referenced in ancient books.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 4
Credit Rating: 9–30
Suggested Contacts: libraries, occult societies, occultists, paranormal publications
Skills: Anthropology, History, Library Use, one interpersonal skill (Charm, Fast Talk, Intimidate, or
Persuade), Occult, Other Language, Science (Astronomy), any one* other skill as a personal or era
specialty.

Parapsychologist
Parapsychologists do not pretend to enjoy extraordinary powers, but instead spend their efforts attempting to observe, record, and study such instances. Sometimes nicknamed “ghost hunters,” they make use of technology to try to capture hard evidence of paranormal activity that may be centered on a person or a location. A major portion of their time is spent debunking fake mediums and mistaken phenomena rather than recording actual evidence. Some parapsychologists will specialize in the study of particular phenomenon, such as extra sensory perception, telekinesis, hauntings, and others.
Prestigious universities grant no degrees for parapsychology. Standards in the field are based entirely upon personal reputation, and so the most acceptable representatives tend to hold degrees in related areas—physics, psychology, or medicine.
Those who choose this path are unusually sympathetic to the notion of invisible mystical powers and in validating that belief to the satisfaction of physical scientists. This would represent an unusual cohabitation of faith and doubt—the parapsychologist may have difficulty separating the conflicting desires. A person uninterested in observation, experimentation, and proof is not a scientist, though he or she may be an occultist.
Occupation Skill Points: EDU × 4
Credit Rating: 9–30
Suggested Contacts: libraries, occult societies, occultists, paranormal publications
Skills: Anthropology, Art/Craft (Photography), History, Library Use, Occult, Other Language, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.
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